Coffee reduces SULT1E1 expression in human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells

Marina Isshiki, Haruka Ohta, Hiroomi Tamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent epidemiological studies have shown that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of certain types of cancers, particularly colon cancer in postmenopausal women. To elucidate the molecular basis for the preventive action of coffee, we investigated the effect of coffee on estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT) because sulfation is the major pathway involved in the inactivation of estrogens. We found that coffee reduced SULT1E1 gene expression in human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells. Treatment with 2.5% (v/v) coffee for 24 h resulted in a 60% reduction of the expression of the SULT1E1 gene in Caco-2 cells. Corresponding to reduced SULT1E1 gene expression, cytosolic estrogen SULT activity toward E2 (20 nm) decreased by 25%. In addition, an accumulation of E2 sulfates in the medium, which reflects cellular activity of estrogen SULT, decreased after the cells were treated with coffee. Major bioactive constituents in coffee such as caffeine, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid did not show any effect. The inhibitory activity was extractable by using ethyl acetate. We also found that the inhibitory activity was produced by roasting the coffee beans. Mithramycin, an inhibitor of the transcription factor stimulating protein 1 (Sp1), was able to restore coffee-reduced SULT1E1 gene expression. Our data suggest that daily coffee consumption may reduce estrogen SULT activity, thereby enhancing estrogenic activity in the colon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalBiological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb

Fingerprint

Caco-2 Cells
Coffee
Colon
Carcinoma
Gene Expression
Colonic Neoplasms
Plicamycin
Chlorogenic Acid
Caffeine
Sulfates
Epidemiologic Studies
Estrogens
Transcription Factors

Keywords

  • Caco-2
  • Coffee
  • Colon cancer
  • Estrogen
  • Stimulating protein 1
  • SULT1E1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Coffee reduces SULT1E1 expression in human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells. / Isshiki, Marina; Ohta, Haruka; Tamura, Hiroomi.

In: Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, Vol. 36, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 299-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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