Colon neoplastic cells do not originate from bone marrow-derived cells after sex-mismatched bone marrow transplantation

Gen Sakai, Tomoharu Yajima, Hiromasa Takaishi, Takehiko Mori, Hajime Higuchi, Shoko Nakamura, Shinsuke Funakoshi, Masayuki Adachi, Motoko Izumiya, Hideko Akagi, Yasuo Hamamoto, Takanori Kanai, Makio Mukai, Shinichiro Okamoto, Toshifumi Hibi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although previous studies indicate that gastrointestinal (GI) cancer may originate from cells recruited from bone marrow (BM) in mice, whether similar phenomena occur in humans is controversial. In the current study, we evaluated two female patients who developed colonic adenocarcinoma more than 10 years after gender-mismatched BM transplantation, and followingly underwent successful endoscopic mucosal resection. Materials and Methods: Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was used to determine whether the tumours contained donor-derived BM cells. Results: Approximately 1.2% of the tumour cells contained Y-chromosome-positive signals, and a comparable percentage of normal colonic epithelial cells close to the tumour also contained Y-chromosome-positive signals. Conclusion: These results do not support the concept that GI cancer can originate from BM-derived cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4097-4103
Number of pages7
JournalAnticancer research
Volume32
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 1

Keywords

  • Cancer stem cell
  • Colon cancer
  • In situ hybridization
  • Sex-mismatched bone marrow transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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