Comparison of motor vehicle collision injuries between pregnant and non-pregnant women: A nationwide collision data-based study

Soonho Koh, Masahito Hitosugi, Shingo Moriguchi, Mineko Baba, Seiji Tsujimura, Arisa Takeda, Marin Takaso, Mami Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the independent predictive factors for moderate and severe injuries, along with characteristics and outcomes of motor vehicle collisions, between pregnant and non-pregnant women. Using 2001–2015 records from the National Automotive Sampling System/Crashworthiness Data System, we selected 736 pregnant women and 21,874 non-pregnant women having any anatomi-cal injuries. Pregnant women showed less severe collisions, fewer fatalities, and less severe injuries in most body regions than non-pregnant women. In pregnant women, the rate of sustaining abbreviated injury scale (AIS) scores 2+ injuries was higher for the abdomen only. For non-pregnant women, rear seat position, airbag deployment, multiple collisions, rollover, force from the left, and higher collision velocity had a positive influence on the likelihood of AIS 2+ injuries, and seatbelt use and force from the rear had a negative influence. There is a need for further development of passive safety technologies for restraint and active safety features to slow down vehicles and mitigate collisions. The influencing factors identified may be improved by safety education. Therefore, simple and effective interventions by health professionals are required that are tailored to pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1414
JournalHealthcare (Switzerland)
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Nov

Keywords

  • Collision database
  • Injury
  • Intervention
  • Motor vehicle collision
  • Pregnant woman
  • Vehicle passenger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Policy
  • Health Information Management
  • Leadership and Management

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