Comparison of reinnervation for preservation of denervated muscle volume with motor and sensory nerve: An experimental study

Makoto Omori, Shunsuke Sakakibara, Kazunobu Hashikawa, Hiroto Terashi, Shinya Tahara, Daisuke Sugiyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prevention of the atrophy of denervated muscles is essential for a good outcome in facial contouring and oral reconstruction. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of end-to-end and end-to-side neurorrhaphy of the motor nerve, and end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sensory nerve, all of which are frequently used in such reconstruction for the prevention of muscle atrophy. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: group 1, motor nerve division of semi-membranosus without repair; group 2, motor nerve division and end-to-end coaptation to the saphenous nerve; group 3, motor nerve division and end-to-side coaptation to the sciatic nerve; and group 4, motor nerve division and end-to-end repair. Measurement of semi-membranosus volume, histological evaluation and staining of neuromuscular junctions that were carried out 3 months postoperatively revealed that muscle volume preservation was larger in groups 3 and 4 than in the other two groups (p < 0.05), but slightly superior in group 4 (p < 0.05). There was no statistical difference between groups 2 and 1; histologically, muscle architecture was better preserved in group 2 than in group 1; reactivation of the neuromuscular junctions was observed in all except group 1. End-to-side repair of motor nerves is one of the better options for the preservation of muscle volume when end-to-end nerve repair is not indicated. Sensory protection may also provide some advantages in the preservation of muscle volume.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)943-949
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery
Volume65
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Muscles
Muscular Atrophy
Neuromuscular Junction
Sciatic Nerve
Wistar Rats
Staining and Labeling

Keywords

  • End-to-end neurorrhaphy
  • End-to-side neurorrhaphy
  • Reinnervation
  • Sensory protection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Comparison of reinnervation for preservation of denervated muscle volume with motor and sensory nerve : An experimental study. / Omori, Makoto; Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Terashi, Hiroto; Tahara, Shinya; Sugiyama, Daisuke.

In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Vol. 65, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 943-949.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Omori, Makoto ; Sakakibara, Shunsuke ; Hashikawa, Kazunobu ; Terashi, Hiroto ; Tahara, Shinya ; Sugiyama, Daisuke. / Comparison of reinnervation for preservation of denervated muscle volume with motor and sensory nerve : An experimental study. In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 65, No. 7. pp. 943-949.
@article{86606d709648466a9731ff16b62308da,
title = "Comparison of reinnervation for preservation of denervated muscle volume with motor and sensory nerve: An experimental study",
abstract = "Prevention of the atrophy of denervated muscles is essential for a good outcome in facial contouring and oral reconstruction. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of end-to-end and end-to-side neurorrhaphy of the motor nerve, and end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sensory nerve, all of which are frequently used in such reconstruction for the prevention of muscle atrophy. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: group 1, motor nerve division of semi-membranosus without repair; group 2, motor nerve division and end-to-end coaptation to the saphenous nerve; group 3, motor nerve division and end-to-side coaptation to the sciatic nerve; and group 4, motor nerve division and end-to-end repair. Measurement of semi-membranosus volume, histological evaluation and staining of neuromuscular junctions that were carried out 3 months postoperatively revealed that muscle volume preservation was larger in groups 3 and 4 than in the other two groups (p < 0.05), but slightly superior in group 4 (p < 0.05). There was no statistical difference between groups 2 and 1; histologically, muscle architecture was better preserved in group 2 than in group 1; reactivation of the neuromuscular junctions was observed in all except group 1. End-to-side repair of motor nerves is one of the better options for the preservation of muscle volume when end-to-end nerve repair is not indicated. Sensory protection may also provide some advantages in the preservation of muscle volume.",
keywords = "End-to-end neurorrhaphy, End-to-side neurorrhaphy, Reinnervation, Sensory protection",
author = "Makoto Omori and Shunsuke Sakakibara and Kazunobu Hashikawa and Hiroto Terashi and Shinya Tahara and Daisuke Sugiyama",
year = "2012",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.bjps.2012.01.018",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "943--949",
journal = "Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery",
issn = "1748-6815",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of reinnervation for preservation of denervated muscle volume with motor and sensory nerve

T2 - An experimental study

AU - Omori, Makoto

AU - Sakakibara, Shunsuke

AU - Hashikawa, Kazunobu

AU - Terashi, Hiroto

AU - Tahara, Shinya

AU - Sugiyama, Daisuke

PY - 2012/7

Y1 - 2012/7

N2 - Prevention of the atrophy of denervated muscles is essential for a good outcome in facial contouring and oral reconstruction. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of end-to-end and end-to-side neurorrhaphy of the motor nerve, and end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sensory nerve, all of which are frequently used in such reconstruction for the prevention of muscle atrophy. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: group 1, motor nerve division of semi-membranosus without repair; group 2, motor nerve division and end-to-end coaptation to the saphenous nerve; group 3, motor nerve division and end-to-side coaptation to the sciatic nerve; and group 4, motor nerve division and end-to-end repair. Measurement of semi-membranosus volume, histological evaluation and staining of neuromuscular junctions that were carried out 3 months postoperatively revealed that muscle volume preservation was larger in groups 3 and 4 than in the other two groups (p < 0.05), but slightly superior in group 4 (p < 0.05). There was no statistical difference between groups 2 and 1; histologically, muscle architecture was better preserved in group 2 than in group 1; reactivation of the neuromuscular junctions was observed in all except group 1. End-to-side repair of motor nerves is one of the better options for the preservation of muscle volume when end-to-end nerve repair is not indicated. Sensory protection may also provide some advantages in the preservation of muscle volume.

AB - Prevention of the atrophy of denervated muscles is essential for a good outcome in facial contouring and oral reconstruction. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of end-to-end and end-to-side neurorrhaphy of the motor nerve, and end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sensory nerve, all of which are frequently used in such reconstruction for the prevention of muscle atrophy. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: group 1, motor nerve division of semi-membranosus without repair; group 2, motor nerve division and end-to-end coaptation to the saphenous nerve; group 3, motor nerve division and end-to-side coaptation to the sciatic nerve; and group 4, motor nerve division and end-to-end repair. Measurement of semi-membranosus volume, histological evaluation and staining of neuromuscular junctions that were carried out 3 months postoperatively revealed that muscle volume preservation was larger in groups 3 and 4 than in the other two groups (p < 0.05), but slightly superior in group 4 (p < 0.05). There was no statistical difference between groups 2 and 1; histologically, muscle architecture was better preserved in group 2 than in group 1; reactivation of the neuromuscular junctions was observed in all except group 1. End-to-side repair of motor nerves is one of the better options for the preservation of muscle volume when end-to-end nerve repair is not indicated. Sensory protection may also provide some advantages in the preservation of muscle volume.

KW - End-to-end neurorrhaphy

KW - End-to-side neurorrhaphy

KW - Reinnervation

KW - Sensory protection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862523987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862523987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bjps.2012.01.018

DO - 10.1016/j.bjps.2012.01.018

M3 - Article

C2 - 22366538

AN - SCOPUS:84862523987

VL - 65

SP - 943

EP - 949

JO - Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery

JF - Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery

SN - 1748-6815

IS - 7

ER -