Comparison of T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging at 1.5 T for assessing the local extent of cervical carcinoma

Ayano Akita, Hiroshi Shinmoto, Shigenori Hayashi, Hirotaka Akita, Takuma Fujii, Shuji Mikami, Akihiro Tanimoto, Sachio Kuribayashi

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare two MR sequences at 1.5 T-T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images-by using macroscopic sections to determine which image type enables the most accurate assessment of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Forty consecutive patients (mean age, 39.2 years) with biopsy-proven cervical carcinoma were included. Each MR sequence was assessed for tumour localisations, tumour margins, and cancer extent with the consensus of two readers, and tumour margins were rated on a five-point scale. MR findings were correlated with histopathological findings. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) obtained with each image were compared using nonparametric tests. Results: Thirty-one of 40 patients underwent hysterectomies and nine of 40 underwent trachelectomies. In 36 patients, lesions were identified on at least one sequence. The tumours at stage 1B or higher were detected in 94.7% on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images and in 76.3% on T2-weighted images (P < 0.05). Tumour margins appeared significantly more distinct on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images than on T2-weighted images (P < 0.001). The CNRs obtained using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those obtained using T2-weighted images. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging is more useful for assessing cervical carcinoma than T2-weighted imaging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1850-1857
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Radiology
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Sep

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Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Noise
Hysterectomy
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Comparative study
  • Diagnostic imaging
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Uterine cervical cancer
  • Uterine cervical neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Comparison of T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging at 1.5 T for assessing the local extent of cervical carcinoma. / Akita, Ayano; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Shigenori; Akita, Hirotaka; Fujii, Takuma; Mikami, Shuji; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio.

In: European Radiology, Vol. 21, No. 9, 09.2011, p. 1850-1857.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To compare two MR sequences at 1.5 T-T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images-by using macroscopic sections to determine which image type enables the most accurate assessment of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Forty consecutive patients (mean age, 39.2 years) with biopsy-proven cervical carcinoma were included. Each MR sequence was assessed for tumour localisations, tumour margins, and cancer extent with the consensus of two readers, and tumour margins were rated on a five-point scale. MR findings were correlated with histopathological findings. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) obtained with each image were compared using nonparametric tests. Results: Thirty-one of 40 patients underwent hysterectomies and nine of 40 underwent trachelectomies. In 36 patients, lesions were identified on at least one sequence. The tumours at stage 1B or higher were detected in 94.7{\%} on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images and in 76.3{\%} on T2-weighted images (P < 0.05). Tumour margins appeared significantly more distinct on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images than on T2-weighted images (P < 0.001). The CNRs obtained using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those obtained using T2-weighted images. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging is more useful for assessing cervical carcinoma than T2-weighted imaging.",
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