Comparison of the frequency of functional SH3 domains with different limited sets of amino acids using mRNA display

Junko Tanaka, Hiroshi Yanagawa, Nobuhide Doi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although modern proteins consist of 20 different amino acids, it has been proposed that primordial proteins consisted of a small set of amino acids, and additional amino acids have gradually been recruited into the genetic code. This hypothesis has recently been supported by comparative genome sequence analysis, but no direct experimental approach has been reported. Here, we utilized a novel experimental approach to test a hypothesis that native-like globular proteins might be easily simplified by a set of putative primitive amino acids with retention of its structure and function than by a set of putative new amino acids. We performed in vitro selection of a functional SH3 domain as a model from partially randomized libraries with different sets of amino acids using mRNA display. Consequently, a library rich in putative primitive amino acids included a larger number of functional SH3 sequences than a library rich in putative new amino acids. Further, the functional SH3 sequences were enriched from the primitive library slightly earlier than from a randomized library with the full set of amino acids, while the function and structure of the selected SH3 proteins with the primitive alphabet were comparable with those from the 20 amino acid alphabet. Application of this approach to various combinations of codons in protein sequences may be useful not only for clarifying the precise order of the amino acid expansion in the early stages of protein evolution but also for efficiently creating novel functional proteins in the laboratory.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere18034
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

src Homology Domains
Display devices
Amino Acids
Messenger RNA
amino acids
Libraries
Proteins
proteins
Genetic Code
genetic code
DNA libraries
codons
Codon
Sequence Analysis
amino acid sequences
sequence analysis
Genes
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Comparison of the frequency of functional SH3 domains with different limited sets of amino acids using mRNA display. / Tanaka, Junko; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Doi, Nobuhide.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 3, e18034, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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