Continuous alertness assessments: Using EOG glasses to unobtrusively monitor fatigue levels in-the-wild

Benjamin Tag, Andrew W. Vargo, Aman Gupta, George Chernyshov, Kai Steven Kunze, Tilman Dingler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the day progresses, cognitive functions are subject to fluctuations. While the circadian process results in diurnal peaks and drops, the homeostatic process manifests itself in a steady decline of alertness across the day. Awareness of these changes allows the design of proactive recommender and warning systems, which encourage demanding tasks during periods of high alertness and flag accident-prone activities in low alertness states. In contrast to conventional alertness assessments, which are often limited to lab conditions, bulky hardware, or interruptive self-assessments, we base our approach on eye blink frequency data known to directly relate to fatigue levels. Using electrooculography sensors integrated into regular glasses’ frames, we recorded the eye movements of 16 participants over the course of two weeks in-the-wild and built a robust model of diurnal alertness changes. Our proposed method allows for unobtrusive and continuous monitoring of alertness levels throughout the day.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Electronic)9781450359702
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 May 2
Event2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2019 - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 2019 May 42019 May 9

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Conference

Conference2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2019
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period19/5/419/5/9

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Keywords

  • Circadian computing
  • Cognition-aware systems
  • Electrooculography
  • Eye blink
  • Fatigue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

Tag, B., Vargo, A. W., Gupta, A., Chernyshov, G., Kunze, K. S., & Dingler, T. (2019). Continuous alertness assessments: Using EOG glasses to unobtrusively monitor fatigue levels in-the-wild. In CHI 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300694