Continuous and selective separation technique of suspended particles by utilizing acoustic radiation and electrostatic forces

Y. Sato, H. Ishida, K. Hishida

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A particle separation technique in a sub-mili channel has been developed by utilizing the acoustic radiation and electrostatic forces, which will be applicable to microfluidic devices. When the acoustic radiation force was applied by an ultrasound transducer, large and small particles were trapped at nodal positions in the standing field, which was equal to half of the wavelength in the transverse direction. On simultaneous application of electric field to the channel, both forces acted on particles. The relationship between the acoustic radiation and electrostatic force acting on particles was investigated in order to separate particles in the flow field.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 11th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, uTAS 2007
EditorsJean-Louis Viovy, Patrick Tabeling, Stephanie Descroix, Laurent Malaquin
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages209-211
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9780979806407
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event11th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, uTAS 2007 - Paris, France
Duration: 2007 Oct 72007 Oct 11

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 11th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, uTAS 2007

Conference

Conference11th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, uTAS 2007
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period07/10/707/10/11

Keywords

  • Acoustic radiation force
  • Electrostatic force
  • PTV
  • Separation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

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