Contribution of propriospinal neurons to recovery of hand dexterity after corticospinal tract lesions in monkeys

Takamichi Tohyama, Masaharu Kinoshita, Kenta Kobayashi, Kaoru Isa, Dai Watanabe, Kazuto Kobayashi, Meigen Liu, Tadashi Isa, Peter L. Strick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The direct cortico-motoneuronal connection is believed to be essential for the control of dexterous hand movements, such as precision grip in primates. It was reported, however, that even after lesion of the corticospinal tract (CST) at the C4-C5 segment, precision grip largely recovered within 1-3 mo, suggesting that the recovery depends on transmission through intercalated neurons rostral to the lesion, such as the propriospinal neurons (PNs) in the midcervical segments. To obtain direct evidence for the contribution of PNs to recovery after CST lesion, we applied a pathway-selective and reversible blocking method using double viral vectors to the PNs in six monkeys after CST lesions at C4-C5. In four monkeys that showed nearly full or partial recovery, transient blockade of PN transmission after recovery caused partial impairment of precision grip. In the other two monkeys, CST lesions were made under continuous blockade of PN transmission that outlasted the entire period of postoperative observation (3-4.5 mo). In these monkeys, precision grip recovery was not achieved. These results provide evidence for causal contribution of the PNs to recovery of hand dexterity after CST lesions; PN transmission is necessary for promoting the initial stage recovery; however, their contribution is only partial once the recovery is achieved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)604-609
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 17

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Pyramidal Tracts
Haplorhini
Hand
Neurons
Hand Strength
Interneurons
Postoperative Period
Primates
Observation

Keywords

  • Neural circuit
  • Nonhuman primates
  • Plasticity
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Viral vector

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Contribution of propriospinal neurons to recovery of hand dexterity after corticospinal tract lesions in monkeys. / Tohyama, Takamichi; Kinoshita, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Kenta; Isa, Kaoru; Watanabe, Dai; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Liu, Meigen; Isa, Tadashi; Strick, Peter L.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 114, No. 3, 17.01.2017, p. 604-609.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tohyama, Takamichi ; Kinoshita, Masaharu ; Kobayashi, Kenta ; Isa, Kaoru ; Watanabe, Dai ; Kobayashi, Kazuto ; Liu, Meigen ; Isa, Tadashi ; Strick, Peter L. / Contribution of propriospinal neurons to recovery of hand dexterity after corticospinal tract lesions in monkeys. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2017 ; Vol. 114, No. 3. pp. 604-609.
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