Cortical Amyloid β Deposition and Current Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Jun Ku Chung, Eric Plitman, Shinichiro Nakajima, M. Mallar Chakravarty, Fernando Caravaggio, Philip Gerretsen, Yusuke Iwata, Ariel Graff-Guerrero, Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Depressive symptoms are frequently seen in patients with dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Evidence suggests that there may be a link between current depressive symptoms and Alzheimer disease (AD)-associated pathological changes, such as an increase in cortical amyloid-β (Aβ). However, limited in vivo studies have explored the relationship between current depressive symptoms and cortical Aβ in patients with MCI and AD. Our study, using a large sample of 455 patients with MCI and 153 patients with AD from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiatives, investigated whether current depressive symptoms are related to cortical Aβ deposition. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale and Neuropsychiatric Inventory-depression/dysphoria. Cortical Aβ was quantified using positron emission tomography with the Aβ probe 18F-florbetapir (AV-45). 18F-florbetapir standardized uptake value ratio (AV-45 SUVR) from the frontal, cingulate, parietal, and temporal regions was estimated. A global AV-45 SUVR, defined as the average of frontal, cingulate, precuneus, and parietal cortex, was also used. We observed that current depressive symptoms were not related to cortical Aβ, after controlling for potential confounds, including history of major depression. We also observed that there was no difference in cortical Aβ between matched participants with high and low depressive symptoms, as well as no difference between matched participants with the presence and absence of depressive symptoms. The association between depression and cortical Aβ deposition does not exist, but the relationship is highly influenced by stressful events in the past, such as previous depressive episodes, and complex interactions of different pathways underlying both depression and dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-159
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Amyloid
Alzheimer Disease
Depression
Parietal Lobe
Gyrus Cinguli
Cognitive Dysfunction
Dementia
Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Neuroimaging
Geriatrics
Positron-Emission Tomography

Keywords

  • beta-amyloid
  • dementia
  • depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Chung, J. K., Plitman, E., Nakajima, S., Chakravarty, M. M., Caravaggio, F., Gerretsen, P., ... Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, D. N. I. (2015). Cortical Amyloid β Deposition and Current Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 29(3), 149-159. https://doi.org/10.1177/0891988715606230

Cortical Amyloid β Deposition and Current Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. / Chung, Jun Ku; Plitman, Eric; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Caravaggio, Fernando; Gerretsen, Philip; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

In: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 149-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, JK, Plitman, E, Nakajima, S, Chakravarty, MM, Caravaggio, F, Gerretsen, P, Iwata, Y, Graff-Guerrero, A & Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, DNI 2015, 'Cortical Amyloid β Deposition and Current Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment', Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 149-159. https://doi.org/10.1177/0891988715606230
Chung, Jun Ku ; Plitman, Eric ; Nakajima, Shinichiro ; Chakravarty, M. Mallar ; Caravaggio, Fernando ; Gerretsen, Philip ; Iwata, Yusuke ; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel ; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. / Cortical Amyloid β Deposition and Current Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. In: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 149-159.
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