Criminal trials in the early Meiji era-with particular reference to the Ukagai/Shirei system

Nobuhiko Kasumi, Daniel H. Foote

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Precisely when, following the Meiji Restoration, did criminal trials in Japan come to be conducted on a national scale, broadly throughout the entire country? In seeking to answer that question, an observation by Yutaka Tezuka1 is of great significance. As he noted, the abolition of the han and establishment of prefectures on July 14, 1871 (Meiji 4), which were made possible by the rise in "political power" of the new Meiji government, and the nationwide putting into force of the first post-Restoration uniform penal code, the Shinritsu kōryō (Outline of the New Criminal Code), promulgated in late December of the prior year, were mutually related. That is because the existence of a uniform penal code is essential in establishing the milieu for achieving a national system of criminal trials.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLaw in Japan: A Turning Point
PublisherUniversity of Washington Press
Pages34-49
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)0295987316, 9780295987316
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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penal code
restoration
political power
Japan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Kasumi, N., & Foote, D. H. (2007). Criminal trials in the early Meiji era-with particular reference to the Ukagai/Shirei system. In Law in Japan: A Turning Point (pp. 34-49). University of Washington Press.

Criminal trials in the early Meiji era-with particular reference to the Ukagai/Shirei system. / Kasumi, Nobuhiko; Foote, Daniel H.

Law in Japan: A Turning Point. University of Washington Press, 2007. p. 34-49.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kasumi, N & Foote, DH 2007, Criminal trials in the early Meiji era-with particular reference to the Ukagai/Shirei system. in Law in Japan: A Turning Point. University of Washington Press, pp. 34-49.
Kasumi N, Foote DH. Criminal trials in the early Meiji era-with particular reference to the Ukagai/Shirei system. In Law in Japan: A Turning Point. University of Washington Press. 2007. p. 34-49
Kasumi, Nobuhiko ; Foote, Daniel H. / Criminal trials in the early Meiji era-with particular reference to the Ukagai/Shirei system. Law in Japan: A Turning Point. University of Washington Press, 2007. pp. 34-49
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