Current understanding of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain: How does adult neurogenesis decrease with age?

Yoshitaka Kase, Yoshitaka Kase, Takuya Shimazaki, Hideyuki Okano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life in restricted brain regions in mammals. However, the number of neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons steadily decreases with age, resulting in a decrease in neurogenesis. Transplantation of mesenchymal cells or cultured NSCs has been studied as a promising treatment in models of several brain injuries including cerebral infarction and cerebral contusion. Considering the problems of host-versus-graft reactions and the tumorigenicity of transplanted cells, the mobilization of endogenous adult NSCs should be more feasible for the treatment of these brain injuries. However, the number of adult NSCs in the adult brain is limited, and their mitotic potential is low. Here, we outline what we know to date about why the number of NSCs and adult neurogenesis decrease with age. We also discuss issues applicable to regenerative medicine.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10
JournalInflammation and Regeneration
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jun 18

Keywords

  • Adult neurogenesis
  • Aging
  • Neural stem cell
  • Subgranular zone
  • Transit amplifying progenitor cell
  • Ventricular-subventricular zone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Current understanding of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain: How does adult neurogenesis decrease with age?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this