Daily training with realistic visual feedback improves reproducibility of event-related desynchronisation following hand motor imagery

Takashi Ono, Akio Kimura, Junichi Ushiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Few brain-computer interface (BCI) studies have addressed learning mechanisms by exposure to visual feedback that elicits scalp electroencephalogram. We examined the effect of realistic visual feedback of hand movement associated with sensorimotor rhythm. Methods: Thirty-two healthy participants performed in five daily training in which they were shown motor imagery of their dominant hand. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups receiving different types of visual feedback on event-related desynchronisation (ERD) derived over the contralateral sensorimotor cortex: no feedback as a control, bar feedback with changing bar length, anatomically incongruent feedback in which the hand open/grasp picture on screen was animated at eye level, and anatomically congruent feedback in which the same hand open/grasp picture was animated on the screen overlaying the participant's hand. Results: Daily training with all types of visual feedback induced more robust ERD than the no feedback condition (p < 0.05). The anatomically congruent feedback produced the highest reproducibility of ERD with the smallest inter-trial variance (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Realistic feedback training is a suitable method to acquire the skill to control a BCI system. Significance: This finding highlights the possibility of improvement of reproducibility of ERD and can help to use BCI techniques.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1779-1786
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume124
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep 1

Keywords

  • Brain-computer interface
  • Event-related desynchronisation
  • Motor imagery
  • Realistic feedback

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

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