Deaccenting, MAXIMIZE PRESUPPOSITION and evidential scale

Yurie Hara, Shigeto Kawahara

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Some studies have assumed that prosodic patterns of sentences are exclusively determined by the rules of accented expressions, with deaccenting of non-focused elements playing little or no role [1, 2]. However,many researchers have also recognized the importance of deaccenting rules [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. This paper documents two intonational patterns of Japanese biased questions,"Rise with Accents" and"Rise with Deaccentuation", used by young speakers of the Tokyo dialect for Japanese biased questions. We argue that Japanese data furthers the deaccenting-as-rule view. Specifically, deaccentuation in biased questions has recently gained a grammaticalized status, and now gives rise to a Givenness presupposition. Moreover, the presuppositions of Bias and Givenness form a scale, i.e., Given ⊂ Bias, which interacts with MAXIMIZE PRESUPPOSITION [8]. Our proposal also naturally extends to the evidential hierarchy proposed in the literature.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008
PublisherInternational Speech Communications Association
Pages509-512
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9780616220030
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event4th International Conference on Speech Prosody 2008, SP 2008 - Campinas, Brazil
Duration: 2008 May 62008 May 9

Other

Other4th International Conference on Speech Prosody 2008, SP 2008
CountryBrazil
CityCampinas
Period08/5/608/5/9

Fingerprint

Givenness
Evidentials
Presupposition
Accent
Tokyo Dialect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Hara, Y., & Kawahara, S. (2008). Deaccenting, MAXIMIZE PRESUPPOSITION and evidential scale. In Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008 (pp. 509-512). International Speech Communications Association.

Deaccenting, MAXIMIZE PRESUPPOSITION and evidential scale. / Hara, Yurie; Kawahara, Shigeto.

Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008. International Speech Communications Association, 2008. p. 509-512.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hara, Y & Kawahara, S 2008, Deaccenting, MAXIMIZE PRESUPPOSITION and evidential scale. in Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008. International Speech Communications Association, pp. 509-512, 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody 2008, SP 2008, Campinas, Brazil, 08/5/6.
Hara Y, Kawahara S. Deaccenting, MAXIMIZE PRESUPPOSITION and evidential scale. In Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008. International Speech Communications Association. 2008. p. 509-512
Hara, Yurie ; Kawahara, Shigeto. / Deaccenting, MAXIMIZE PRESUPPOSITION and evidential scale. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2008. International Speech Communications Association, 2008. pp. 509-512
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