Decreased risk of esophageal cancer owing to cigarette and alcohol cessation in smokers and drinkers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The Committee For The “Guidelines For Diagnosis And Treatment Of Carcinoma Of The Esophagus” Of The Japan Esophageal Society

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcoholic beverages are considered very important risk factors for adverse health effects, such as many types of cancer and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we evaluated the influence of smoking and drinking cessation on risk of esophageal cancer, by means of meta-analysis. We extracted 205 studies by conducting a systematic literature search. Thirty-five studies that estimated risk reduction following smoking cessation and 18 studies conducted following drinking cessation were identified in the literature review. Former smokers had a significantly lower summary risk ratio (RR) than current smokers [RR 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68–0.80]. In subgroup analysis of Japanese smokers, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma, RRs for former smokers versus current smokers were 0.65 (95% CI 0.51–0.83), 0.60 (95% CI 0.50–0.72), and 0.93 (95% CI 0.84–1.03), respectively. The summary RR between former alcohol drinkers and current drinkers was not significant (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.94–1.26). In our analysis of time since drinking cessation, drinkers who had stopped consuming alcohol for 5 years or more had a significantly lower summary RR than current drinkers (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.66–0.93). Summary RR for drinkers who stopped for 10 years or more versus current drinkers was 0.65 (95% CI 0.57–0.74). Our investigation found that smoking cessation lowers esophageal cancer incidence. We also found that esophageal cancer incidence risk could be decreased in current drinkers by cessation of alcohol consumption for 5 years or more.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalEsophagus
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017 Jun 8

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Esophageal Neoplasms
Tobacco Products
Meta-Analysis
Odds Ratio
Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Drinking
Smoking Cessation
Alcoholic Beverages
Incidence
Risk Reduction Behavior
Alcohol Drinking
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Health
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Carcinogenesis
  • Deinking cessation
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Guidelines
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

The Committee For The “Guidelines For Diagnosis And Treatment Of Carcinoma Of The Esophagus” Of The Japan Esophageal Society (Accepted/In press). Decreased risk of esophageal cancer owing to cigarette and alcohol cessation in smokers and drinkers: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Esophagus, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10388-017-0582-8

Decreased risk of esophageal cancer owing to cigarette and alcohol cessation in smokers and drinkers : a systematic review and meta-analysis. / The Committee For The “Guidelines For Diagnosis And Treatment Of Carcinoma Of The Esophagus” Of The Japan Esophageal Society.

In: Esophagus, 08.06.2017, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

The Committee For The “Guidelines For Diagnosis And Treatment Of Carcinoma Of The Esophagus” Of The Japan Esophageal Society 2017, 'Decreased risk of esophageal cancer owing to cigarette and alcohol cessation in smokers and drinkers: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Esophagus, pp. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10388-017-0582-8
The Committee For The “Guidelines For Diagnosis And Treatment Of Carcinoma Of The Esophagus” Of The Japan Esophageal Society. Decreased risk of esophageal cancer owing to cigarette and alcohol cessation in smokers and drinkers: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Esophagus. 2017 Jun 8;1-13. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10388-017-0582-8
The Committee For The “Guidelines For Diagnosis And Treatment Of Carcinoma Of The Esophagus” Of The Japan Esophageal Society. / Decreased risk of esophageal cancer owing to cigarette and alcohol cessation in smokers and drinkers : a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Esophagus. 2017 ; pp. 1-13.
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