Defective corticogenesis and reduction in Reelin immunoreactivity in cortex and hippocampus of prenatally infected neonatal mice

S. H. Fatemi, E. S. Emamian, D. Kist, R. W. Sidwell, Kazunori Nakajima, P. Akhter, A. Shier, S. Sheikh, K. Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

201 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent reports indicate an association between second trimester human influenza viral infection and later development of schizophrenia. Postmortem human brain studies also provide evidence for reduction in Reelin mRNA (an important secretory protein responsible for normal lamination of the brain) in schizophrenic brains. We hypothesized that human influenza infection in day 9 pregnant mice would alter the expression of reelin in day 0 neonatal brains. Prenatally-infected murine brains from postnatal day 0 showed significant reductions in reelin-positive cell counts in layer 1 of neocortex and other cortical and hippocampal layers when compared to controls. Whereas layer 1 Cajal-Retzius cells produced significantly less Reelin in infected animals, the same cells showed normal production of calretinin and nNOS when compared to control brains. Moreover, prenatal viral infection caused decreases in neocortical and hippocampal thickness. These results implicate a potential role of prenatal viral infection in causation of neuronal migration abnormalities via reduction in Reelin production in neonatal brains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-154
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Volume4
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hippocampus
Brain
Virus Diseases
Human Influenza
Calbindin 2
Neocortex
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Causality
Schizophrenia
Cell Count
Messenger RNA
Infection
Proteins

Keywords

  • Infection
  • Influenza
  • Mice
  • Prenatal
  • Reelin
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Fatemi, S. H., Emamian, E. S., Kist, D., Sidwell, R. W., Nakajima, K., Akhter, P., ... Bailey, K. (1999). Defective corticogenesis and reduction in Reelin immunoreactivity in cortex and hippocampus of prenatally infected neonatal mice. Molecular Psychiatry, 4(2), 145-154.

Defective corticogenesis and reduction in Reelin immunoreactivity in cortex and hippocampus of prenatally infected neonatal mice. / Fatemi, S. H.; Emamian, E. S.; Kist, D.; Sidwell, R. W.; Nakajima, Kazunori; Akhter, P.; Shier, A.; Sheikh, S.; Bailey, K.

In: Molecular Psychiatry, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1999, p. 145-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fatemi, SH, Emamian, ES, Kist, D, Sidwell, RW, Nakajima, K, Akhter, P, Shier, A, Sheikh, S & Bailey, K 1999, 'Defective corticogenesis and reduction in Reelin immunoreactivity in cortex and hippocampus of prenatally infected neonatal mice', Molecular Psychiatry, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 145-154.
Fatemi, S. H. ; Emamian, E. S. ; Kist, D. ; Sidwell, R. W. ; Nakajima, Kazunori ; Akhter, P. ; Shier, A. ; Sheikh, S. ; Bailey, K. / Defective corticogenesis and reduction in Reelin immunoreactivity in cortex and hippocampus of prenatally infected neonatal mice. In: Molecular Psychiatry. 1999 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 145-154.
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