Deleterious effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on early graft function after single lung allotransplantation: Evaluation of a heparin-coated bypass circuit

N. A. Francalancia, R. Aeba, S. A. Yousem, B. P. Griffith, G. C. Marrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical lung transplantation may necessitate the use of cardiopulmonary bypass during the procedure, resulting in increased morbidity with more severe early graft dysfunction and increased blood loss. A heparin surface- coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuit is now available with improved biocompatibility and reduced systemic heparin requirements and may offer advantages compared with standard uncoated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. This study investigates in a canine model of single-lung allotransplantation whether cardiopulmonary bypass adversely affects early graft function and whether a heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuit with reduced systemic heparin dosage improves results compared with standard uncoated cardiopulmonary bypass systems. Fifteen dogs underwent left single-lung allotransplantation with occlusion of the contralateral pulmonary artery and bronchus 1 hour after reperfusion. In one group, five animals underwent the procedure without cardiopulmonary bypass. In the group with uncoated circuits, five animals underwent the procedure with the use of standard uncoated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits with full systemic heparin dosage. In the group with heparin-coated circuits, five animals underwent the procedure with the use of heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits and reduced systemic heparin dosage. Early graft function was evaluated by arterial oxygenation, pulmonary mechanics, lung water measurements, and histologic analysis. Hemodynamics and postoperative blood loss were also measured. Two hours after reperfusion, partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood on an inspired oxygen fraction = 1.0 was significantly greater (p < 0.001) in the group without cardiopulmonary bypass (467 ± 58 mm Hg) than in the group with uncoated circuits (114 ± 90 mm Hg) and the group with heparin-coated circuits (193 ± 105 mm Hg), with no significant difference between the groups undergoing bypass procedures. Lung compliance decreased and lung water increased in all transplanted lungs without significant differences between groups. Histologic analysis did not differentiate between the groups. After reperfusion, cardiac index and mean arterial pressure were significantly reduced in the groups with uncoated circuits and with heparin- coated circuits compared with the group that did not undergo cardiopulmonary bypass (p < 0.001). Postoperative blood loss was significantly less (p < 0.002) in the group that did not undergo cardiopulmonary bypass (90 ml ± 38 ml) compared with both the group with uncoated circuits (750 ± 15 ml) and the group with heparin-coated circuits (690 ± 387 ml), with no significant difference between the groups that underwent bypass. The use of cardiopulmonary bypass with systemic heparinization is detrimental to early graft function in this canine model of left single-lung allotransplantation. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits with reduced systemic heparin dosage did not provide benefits compared with standard uncoated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits with full systemic heparinization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)498-507
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume13
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1994 Jan 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Transplantation

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