Derangement of ghrelin secretion after long-term high-fat diet feeding in rats

Aya Sugiishi, Masaki Kimura, Ryo Kamiya, Satomi Ueki, Mikiko Yoneya, Yoshimasa Saito, Hidetsugu Saito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Appetite control is an important goal for the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes mellitus and obesity; however, little is known about how hormones concerning appetite regulation are affected by long-term consumption of a high-fat diet. We investigated the effect of high-fat diet on secretory regulation of ghrelin and leptin in rats. Methods: Rats were fed a control or a high-fat diet for 18 weeks and then killed. Before being killed, a glucose tolerance test was performed. Weight, total calorie intake and blood glucose levels were measured, and the plasma levels of total and active ghrelin, and leptin were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Body and fat weight and total calorie intake were significantly higher in the high-fat diet group than in the control, although blood glucose levels did not differ. Plasma leptin was significantly higher in the high-fat diet group, and a significant positive correlation was observed between bodyweight and leptin levels in both groups. The levels of active and total ghrelin were not significantly changed by high-fat diet, and active ghrelin levels in the control group significantly correlated negatively with bodyweight, while its correlation was lost in the high-fat diet group. The glucose tolerance test showed that ghrelin levels were significantly higher than those of controls even 60min after glucose loading. Conclusion: These results indicate that secretion of ghrelin, but not leptin, are deranged by consumption of a high-fat diet, and active ghrelin levels lose their correlation with bodyweight and food intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1105-1114
Number of pages10
JournalHepatology Research
Volume43
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct

Fingerprint

Ghrelin
High Fat Diet
Leptin
Glucose Tolerance Test
Blood Glucose
Appetite Regulation
Control Groups
Appetite
Adipose Tissue
Diabetes Mellitus
Obesity
Eating
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Body Weight
Hormones
Weights and Measures
Glucose

Keywords

  • Appetite
  • Calorie
  • Central obesity
  • Leptin
  • Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Derangement of ghrelin secretion after long-term high-fat diet feeding in rats. / Sugiishi, Aya; Kimura, Masaki; Kamiya, Ryo; Ueki, Satomi; Yoneya, Mikiko; Saito, Yoshimasa; Saito, Hidetsugu.

In: Hepatology Research, Vol. 43, No. 10, 10.2013, p. 1105-1114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sugiishi, Aya ; Kimura, Masaki ; Kamiya, Ryo ; Ueki, Satomi ; Yoneya, Mikiko ; Saito, Yoshimasa ; Saito, Hidetsugu. / Derangement of ghrelin secretion after long-term high-fat diet feeding in rats. In: Hepatology Research. 2013 ; Vol. 43, No. 10. pp. 1105-1114.
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