Detection of human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus in diffuse interstitial pneumonia by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry

Y. Oda, S. Katsuda, Y. Okada, E. I. Kawahara, A. Ooi, A. Kawashima, I. Nakanishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues from autopsy, the authors examined infection by human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus in 54 patients with primary or secondary diffuse interstitial pneumonia (DIP) by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry and compared it with that in 32 persons without lung complications. Polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that approximately 40% and 30% of DIP were positive for human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, respectively, but none of 32 controls had evidence of infection by human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus. The polymerase chain reaction was more sensitive than the immunohistochemical technique for detection of herpes simplex virus. The former technique revealed herpes simplex virus infection in approximately 90% of DIP and controls and the latter in approximately 50% of each group. However, immunohistochemistry had the advantage of demonstrating the morphologic location of infected cells and of allowing their semiquantitative evaluation. Herpes simplex virus was more extensively distributed in the lungs of several DIP cases than in those of controls, suggesting the reactivation of herpes simplex virus. Only DIP patients (31 cases [57.4%]) were infected by two or three kinds of herpesviruses. The combination of polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry revealed that these herpesviruses proliferated in many cases of DIP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)495-502
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume102
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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Interstitial Lung Diseases
Simplexvirus
Cytomegalovirus
Human Herpesvirus 4
Immunohistochemistry
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Herpesviridae
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Lung
Virus Diseases
Paraffin
Formaldehyde
Autopsy

Keywords

  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Diffuse interstitial pneumonia
  • Epstein-Barr virus
  • Herpes simplex virus
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Polymerase chain reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Detection of human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus in diffuse interstitial pneumonia by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. / Oda, Y.; Katsuda, S.; Okada, Y.; Kawahara, E. I.; Ooi, A.; Kawashima, A.; Nakanishi, I.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 102, No. 4, 1994, p. 495-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oda, Y. ; Katsuda, S. ; Okada, Y. ; Kawahara, E. I. ; Ooi, A. ; Kawashima, A. ; Nakanishi, I. / Detection of human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus in diffuse interstitial pneumonia by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 1994 ; Vol. 102, No. 4. pp. 495-502.
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