Determining the temperature distribution of swine aorta with simulated atheromatous plaque under pulsed laser irradiation: An experimental attempt to detect the vulnerability of atherosclerosis

T. Matsui, Tsunenori Arai, K. Matsumurat, T. Ishizukat, K. Hagisawa, B. Takase, S. Sato, M. Suzuki, M. Kikuchi, A. Kurita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We developed a method to determine the temperature distribution of swine aortas with simulated atheromatous plaques in order to measure the temperature of atherosclerotic lesions. The inflammation associated with temperature elevation is considered to be one of the aggravating mechanisms of atherosclerosis resulting in fissuring or rupture of atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution of plaques covered by fibrous caps cannot be measured by conventional thermistors. Indocyanine green (ICG) solution was injected into the subintima of swine aorta to simulate the light absorption coefficient of human atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution was calculated from measured temperature changes of the aortic intima under pulsed laser irradiation. The aorta was heated from the adventitial side with a halogen lamp to simulate the temperature elevation derived from inflammation. The temperature distribution of the aorta was obtained by solving the heat transfer equation using the surface layer thickness (corresponding to the fibrous cap thickness). The surface layer thickness can be calculated using the following working formula: D(μm) =1363 - 398Δ Ts+35Δ T2s, where ΔTs denotes intimal surface temperature change under pulsed laser irradiation. The calculated temperature of the ICG layer (corresponding to the atheromatous core) correlated well with the measured temperature (r=0.97, p<0.0001).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-184
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Medical Engineering and Technology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atherosclerotic Plaques
Laser beam effects
Pulsed lasers
Aorta
Atherosclerosis
Temperature distribution
Lasers
Swine
Temperature
Indocyanine Green
Thermistors
Electric lamps
Light absorption
Tunica Intima
Inflammation
Adventitia
Halogens
Heat transfer
Rupture
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Determining the temperature distribution of swine aorta with simulated atheromatous plaque under pulsed laser irradiation : An experimental attempt to detect the vulnerability of atherosclerosis. / Matsui, T.; Arai, Tsunenori; Matsumurat, K.; Ishizukat, T.; Hagisawa, K.; Takase, B.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, M.; Kikuchi, M.; Kurita, A.

In: Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 2001, p. 181-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsui, T. ; Arai, Tsunenori ; Matsumurat, K. ; Ishizukat, T. ; Hagisawa, K. ; Takase, B. ; Sato, S. ; Suzuki, M. ; Kikuchi, M. ; Kurita, A. / Determining the temperature distribution of swine aorta with simulated atheromatous plaque under pulsed laser irradiation : An experimental attempt to detect the vulnerability of atherosclerosis. In: Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology. 2001 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 181-184.
@article{a11592ede8f742edb97a220bbc6edf66,
title = "Determining the temperature distribution of swine aorta with simulated atheromatous plaque under pulsed laser irradiation: An experimental attempt to detect the vulnerability of atherosclerosis",
abstract = "We developed a method to determine the temperature distribution of swine aortas with simulated atheromatous plaques in order to measure the temperature of atherosclerotic lesions. The inflammation associated with temperature elevation is considered to be one of the aggravating mechanisms of atherosclerosis resulting in fissuring or rupture of atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution of plaques covered by fibrous caps cannot be measured by conventional thermistors. Indocyanine green (ICG) solution was injected into the subintima of swine aorta to simulate the light absorption coefficient of human atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution was calculated from measured temperature changes of the aortic intima under pulsed laser irradiation. The aorta was heated from the adventitial side with a halogen lamp to simulate the temperature elevation derived from inflammation. The temperature distribution of the aorta was obtained by solving the heat transfer equation using the surface layer thickness (corresponding to the fibrous cap thickness). The surface layer thickness can be calculated using the following working formula: D(μm) =1363 - 398Δ Ts+35Δ T2s, where ΔTs denotes intimal surface temperature change under pulsed laser irradiation. The calculated temperature of the ICG layer (corresponding to the atheromatous core) correlated well with the measured temperature (r=0.97, p<0.0001).",
author = "T. Matsui and Tsunenori Arai and K. Matsumurat and T. Ishizukat and K. Hagisawa and B. Takase and S. Sato and M. Suzuki and M. Kikuchi and A. Kurita",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1080/03091900110074672",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "181--184",
journal = "Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology",
issn = "0309-1902",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determining the temperature distribution of swine aorta with simulated atheromatous plaque under pulsed laser irradiation

T2 - An experimental attempt to detect the vulnerability of atherosclerosis

AU - Matsui, T.

AU - Arai, Tsunenori

AU - Matsumurat, K.

AU - Ishizukat, T.

AU - Hagisawa, K.

AU - Takase, B.

AU - Sato, S.

AU - Suzuki, M.

AU - Kikuchi, M.

AU - Kurita, A.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - We developed a method to determine the temperature distribution of swine aortas with simulated atheromatous plaques in order to measure the temperature of atherosclerotic lesions. The inflammation associated with temperature elevation is considered to be one of the aggravating mechanisms of atherosclerosis resulting in fissuring or rupture of atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution of plaques covered by fibrous caps cannot be measured by conventional thermistors. Indocyanine green (ICG) solution was injected into the subintima of swine aorta to simulate the light absorption coefficient of human atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution was calculated from measured temperature changes of the aortic intima under pulsed laser irradiation. The aorta was heated from the adventitial side with a halogen lamp to simulate the temperature elevation derived from inflammation. The temperature distribution of the aorta was obtained by solving the heat transfer equation using the surface layer thickness (corresponding to the fibrous cap thickness). The surface layer thickness can be calculated using the following working formula: D(μm) =1363 - 398Δ Ts+35Δ T2s, where ΔTs denotes intimal surface temperature change under pulsed laser irradiation. The calculated temperature of the ICG layer (corresponding to the atheromatous core) correlated well with the measured temperature (r=0.97, p<0.0001).

AB - We developed a method to determine the temperature distribution of swine aortas with simulated atheromatous plaques in order to measure the temperature of atherosclerotic lesions. The inflammation associated with temperature elevation is considered to be one of the aggravating mechanisms of atherosclerosis resulting in fissuring or rupture of atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution of plaques covered by fibrous caps cannot be measured by conventional thermistors. Indocyanine green (ICG) solution was injected into the subintima of swine aorta to simulate the light absorption coefficient of human atheromatous plaques. The temperature distribution was calculated from measured temperature changes of the aortic intima under pulsed laser irradiation. The aorta was heated from the adventitial side with a halogen lamp to simulate the temperature elevation derived from inflammation. The temperature distribution of the aorta was obtained by solving the heat transfer equation using the surface layer thickness (corresponding to the fibrous cap thickness). The surface layer thickness can be calculated using the following working formula: D(μm) =1363 - 398Δ Ts+35Δ T2s, where ΔTs denotes intimal surface temperature change under pulsed laser irradiation. The calculated temperature of the ICG layer (corresponding to the atheromatous core) correlated well with the measured temperature (r=0.97, p<0.0001).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17944375487&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17944375487&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/03091900110074672

DO - 10.1080/03091900110074672

M3 - Article

C2 - 11695657

AN - SCOPUS:17944375487

VL - 25

SP - 181

EP - 184

JO - Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology

JF - Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology

SN - 0309-1902

IS - 5

ER -