Dialysis membrane-enforced microelectrode array measurement of diverse gut electrical activity

Naoko Iwata, Takumi Fujimura, Chiho Takai, Kei Odani, Shin Kawano, Shinsuke Nakayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A variety of electrical activities occur depending on the functional state in each section of the gut, but the application of microelectrode array (MEA) is rather limited. We thus developed a dialysis membranes-enforced technique to investigate diverse and complex spatio-temporal electrical activity in the gut. Muscle sheets isolated from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice along with a piece of dialysis membrane were woven over and under the strings to fix them to the anchor rig, and mounted on an 8×8 MEA (inter-electrode distance=150 µm). Small molecules (molecular weight <12,000) were exchanged through the membrane, maintaining a physiological environment. Low impedance MEA was used to measure electrical signals in a wide frequency range. We demonstrated the following examples: 1) pacemaker activity-like potentials accompanied by bursting spike-like potentials in the ileum; 2) electrotonic potentials reflecting local neurotransmission in the ileum; 3) myoelectric complex-like potentials consisting of slow and rapid oscillations accompanied by spike potentials in the colon. Despite their limited spatial resolution, these recordings detected transient electric activities that optical probes followed with difficulty. In Addition, propagation of pacemaker-like potential was visualized in the stomach and ileum. These results indicate that the dialysis membrane-enforced technique largely extends the application of MEA, probably due to stabilisation of the access resistance between each sensing electrode and a reference electrode and improvement of electric separation between sensing electrodes. We anticipate that this technique will be utilized to characterise spatio-temporal electrical activities in the gut in health and disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)312-320
Number of pages9
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume94
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Aug 15

Fingerprint

Dialysis membranes
Microelectrodes
Dialysis
Electrodes
Ileum
Pacemakers
Membranes
Action Potentials
Optical Rotation
Anchors
Electric Impedance
Synaptic Transmission
Muscle
Gastrointestinal Tract
Stomach
Colon
Stabilization
Molecular Weight
Molecular weight
Health

Keywords

  • Access resistance
  • Dialysis membrane
  • Electric complex
  • Electric separation
  • Pacemaker
  • Tonic potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Dialysis membrane-enforced microelectrode array measurement of diverse gut electrical activity. / Iwata, Naoko; Fujimura, Takumi; Takai, Chiho; Odani, Kei; Kawano, Shin; Nakayama, Shinsuke.

In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Vol. 94, 15.08.2017, p. 312-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iwata, Naoko ; Fujimura, Takumi ; Takai, Chiho ; Odani, Kei ; Kawano, Shin ; Nakayama, Shinsuke. / Dialysis membrane-enforced microelectrode array measurement of diverse gut electrical activity. In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics. 2017 ; Vol. 94. pp. 312-320.
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