Dietary Supplementation with a Combination of Lactoferrin, Fish Oil, and Enterococcus faecium WB2000 for Treating Dry Eye: A Rat Model and Human Clinical Study

Motoko Kawashima, Shigeru Nakamura, Yusuke Izuta, Sachiko Inoue, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To examine the effect of a combined dietary supplement containing fish oil, lactoferrin, zinc, vitamin C, lutein, vitamin E, γ-aminobutanoic acid, and Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on dry eye. Methods A preliminary study in a rat model and a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in humans were conducted. Forty Japanese volunteers aged 22 to 59 years were randomized into combined dietary supplement (2 capsules/day; 20 participants) and placebo (vehicle; 19 participants) groups and treated once daily for 8 weeks. Rats received the combined dietary supplement components (10 or 50 mg/kg orally) or vehicle (2% DMSO), and dry eye was mechanically induced for 2 days. Tear production was measured in rats after dry eye was induced. Humans were assessed at baseline and weeks 4 and 8 post-supplementation based on keratoconjunctival epithelial damage; fluorescein tear film breakup time; tear production; biochemical data; information regarding subjective dry eye symptoms by answering a questionnaire; and information regarding adverse events via medical interviews. Results Supplementation dose-dependently mitigated the decrease in tear production in rats. Among subjects with confirmed dry eye, clinical symptoms improved at weeks 4 and 8 more significantly in the supplementation group than in the placebo group (P<.05). The rate of increase in the Schirmer value was greater in the supplementation group. No adverse events occurred. Conclusion Supplementation improved objective and subjective dry eye symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-263
Number of pages9
JournalOcular Surface
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Apr 1

Keywords

  • Schirmer test
  • dietary supplements
  • dry eye
  • tears

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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