Difference between home and office blood pressures among treated hypertensive patients from the Japan home versus office blood pressure Measurement Evaluation (J-HOME) study

Tsuyoshi Horikawa, Taku Obara, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Kei Asayama, Hirohito Metoki, Ryusuke Inoue, Masahiro Kikuya, Junichiro Hashimoto, Kazuhito Totsune, Yutaka Imai, Masatoshi Fujishima, Takao Saruta, Toshio Ogihara, Kazuaki Shimamoto, Toshiro Fujita, Kazuyuki Shimada, Toshio Ikeda, Iwao Kuwajima, Kuriyama Satoru, Kazuomi KarioTetsuo Kato, Koji Tanaka, Taku Shibamiya, Azusa Hara, Takuya Oikawa, Rie Komai, Kayo Murai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study sought to clarify the factors associated with the magnitude of the difference between home and office blood pressures in treated hypertensive patients. Study subjects consisted of 3,308 essentia hypertensive patients (mean age, 66 years; males, 44%) receiving antihypertensive treatment in primary care settings in Japan. Patients were classified into 3 groups (the home effect group, small difference group, and office effect group) according to tertlies of the magnitude of the office-home systolic blood pressure difference. Compared to the other two groups, the home effect group patients were significantly and independently older, were more often habitual drinkers, had a greater family history of cerebrovascular disease or personal history of ischemic heart disease, and were prescribed a greater number of antihypertensive drugs, non-amiodipine calcium channel blockers, and α-blockers as antihypertensive drugs. Compared to the other two groups, the office effect group patients were significantly and independently younger, included more females, less frequently had a family history of cerebrovascular disease or personal history of ischemic heart disease, and were less often prescribed α-blockers as antihypertensive drugs. The characteristics of home effect group patients and the factors negatively affecting the blood pressure difference were the same. Among treated hypertensive patients, compared to patients in the other groups, office effect group patients had a lower-risk profile, whereas home effect group patients had a higher-risk profile. These predictive factors might be useful clinically to help identify patients who may have a large difference between home and office blood pressures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1115-1123
Number of pages9
JournalHypertension Research
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jun 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Japan
Blood Pressure
Group Homes
Antihypertensive Agents
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Myocardial Ischemia
Calcium Channel Blockers
Primary Health Care

Keywords

  • Antihypertensive treatment
  • Home blood pressure
  • Office blood pressure
  • White-cost effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Difference between home and office blood pressures among treated hypertensive patients from the Japan home versus office blood pressure Measurement Evaluation (J-HOME) study. / Horikawa, Tsuyoshi; Obara, Taku; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Asayama, Kei; Metoki, Hirohito; Inoue, Ryusuke; Kikuya, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Junichiro; Totsune, Kazuhito; Imai, Yutaka; Fujishima, Masatoshi; Saruta, Takao; Ogihara, Toshio; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Fujita, Toshiro; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Toshio; Kuwajima, Iwao; Satoru, Kuriyama; Kario, Kazuomi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Koji; Shibamiya, Taku; Hara, Azusa; Oikawa, Takuya; Komai, Rie; Murai, Kayo.

In: Hypertension Research, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.06.2008, p. 1115-1123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horikawa, T, Obara, T, Ohkubo, T, Asayama, K, Metoki, H, Inoue, R, Kikuya, M, Hashimoto, J, Totsune, K, Imai, Y, Fujishima, M, Saruta, T, Ogihara, T, Shimamoto, K, Fujita, T, Shimada, K, Ikeda, T, Kuwajima, I, Satoru, K, Kario, K, Kato, T, Tanaka, K, Shibamiya, T, Hara, A, Oikawa, T, Komai, R & Murai, K 2008, 'Difference between home and office blood pressures among treated hypertensive patients from the Japan home versus office blood pressure Measurement Evaluation (J-HOME) study', Hypertension Research, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 1115-1123. https://doi.org/10.1291/hypres.31.1115
Horikawa, Tsuyoshi ; Obara, Taku ; Ohkubo, Takayoshi ; Asayama, Kei ; Metoki, Hirohito ; Inoue, Ryusuke ; Kikuya, Masahiro ; Hashimoto, Junichiro ; Totsune, Kazuhito ; Imai, Yutaka ; Fujishima, Masatoshi ; Saruta, Takao ; Ogihara, Toshio ; Shimamoto, Kazuaki ; Fujita, Toshiro ; Shimada, Kazuyuki ; Ikeda, Toshio ; Kuwajima, Iwao ; Satoru, Kuriyama ; Kario, Kazuomi ; Kato, Tetsuo ; Tanaka, Koji ; Shibamiya, Taku ; Hara, Azusa ; Oikawa, Takuya ; Komai, Rie ; Murai, Kayo. / Difference between home and office blood pressures among treated hypertensive patients from the Japan home versus office blood pressure Measurement Evaluation (J-HOME) study. In: Hypertension Research. 2008 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 1115-1123.
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