Differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine use between patients attending integrative kampo versus biomedical clinics in Japan

Melissa K. Melby, Tetsuhiro Yoshino, Dunia Tonob, Yuko Horiba, Kenji Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Growing interest in integrative medicine motivates examination of who seeks integrative care, and why. By examining differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use between patients recruited from Japanese Kampo (traditional herbal medicine) versus biomedical clinics, this study aimed to identify whether integrative medicine options might attract different patients. Design and setting: In this cross-sectional, observational study we administered the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine-Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to 209 patients recruited from four hospital clinics. Demographics, use of different types of CAM (self-help CAM, CAM practitioners, CAM products), and motivations were compared between Kampo and Non-Kampo patients and by gender. Factors influencing attendance at the Kampo clinic and CAM use were identified using logistic regression. Results: While some demographic characteristics, CAM provider and total CAM use differed between Kampo and non-Kampo patients, self-help CAM use did not. Motivations (for acute, long-term, health maintenance, or other reasons) differed between Kampo and non-Kampo clinic patients for going to non-Kampo physicians (P = 0.02) and Kampo physicians (P = 0.1). Logistic regression results for ‘any CAM’ use showed odds ratio of 0.32 (95%CI 0.15-0.67) for self-rated health, and 1.60 (95%CI 1.10–2.32) for Macarthur subjective social status scale. Attendance at the Kampo clinic showed odds ratios of 1.50 (95%CI 1.11–2.02) for education and 0.56 (95%CI 0.39-0.80) for employment status. Conclusions: Better understanding of factors such as motivation, self-rated health, and socioeconomic conditions that influence patients’ CAM use and integrative clinic attendance may enable more effective targeting of populations and integration of CAM into biomedical settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-209
Number of pages8
JournalComplementary Therapies in Medicine
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 1

Fingerprint

Kampo Medicine
Complementary Therapies
Japan
Demography
Integrative Medicine

Keywords

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Healthcare access
  • Integrative medicine
  • Kampo
  • Patient-centered care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and Manual Therapy
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this

Differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine use between patients attending integrative kampo versus biomedical clinics in Japan. / Melby, Melissa K.; Yoshino, Tetsuhiro; Tonob, Dunia; Horiba, Yuko; Watanabe, Kenji.

In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Vol. 46, 01.10.2019, p. 202-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f595c0c567894037bfef3a0727e54539,
title = "Differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine use between patients attending integrative kampo versus biomedical clinics in Japan",
abstract = "Objectives: Growing interest in integrative medicine motivates examination of who seeks integrative care, and why. By examining differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use between patients recruited from Japanese Kampo (traditional herbal medicine) versus biomedical clinics, this study aimed to identify whether integrative medicine options might attract different patients. Design and setting: In this cross-sectional, observational study we administered the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine-Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to 209 patients recruited from four hospital clinics. Demographics, use of different types of CAM (self-help CAM, CAM practitioners, CAM products), and motivations were compared between Kampo and Non-Kampo patients and by gender. Factors influencing attendance at the Kampo clinic and CAM use were identified using logistic regression. Results: While some demographic characteristics, CAM provider and total CAM use differed between Kampo and non-Kampo patients, self-help CAM use did not. Motivations (for acute, long-term, health maintenance, or other reasons) differed between Kampo and non-Kampo clinic patients for going to non-Kampo physicians (P = 0.02) and Kampo physicians (P = 0.1). Logistic regression results for ‘any CAM’ use showed odds ratio of 0.32 (95{\%}CI 0.15-0.67) for self-rated health, and 1.60 (95{\%}CI 1.10–2.32) for Macarthur subjective social status scale. Attendance at the Kampo clinic showed odds ratios of 1.50 (95{\%}CI 1.11–2.02) for education and 0.56 (95{\%}CI 0.39-0.80) for employment status. Conclusions: Better understanding of factors such as motivation, self-rated health, and socioeconomic conditions that influence patients’ CAM use and integrative clinic attendance may enable more effective targeting of populations and integration of CAM into biomedical settings.",
keywords = "Complementary and alternative medicine, Healthcare access, Integrative medicine, Kampo, Patient-centered care",
author = "Melby, {Melissa K.} and Tetsuhiro Yoshino and Dunia Tonob and Yuko Horiba and Kenji Watanabe",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ctim.2019.06.003",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "202--209",
journal = "Complementary Therapies in Medicine",
issn = "0965-2299",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine use between patients attending integrative kampo versus biomedical clinics in Japan

AU - Melby, Melissa K.

AU - Yoshino, Tetsuhiro

AU - Tonob, Dunia

AU - Horiba, Yuko

AU - Watanabe, Kenji

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Objectives: Growing interest in integrative medicine motivates examination of who seeks integrative care, and why. By examining differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use between patients recruited from Japanese Kampo (traditional herbal medicine) versus biomedical clinics, this study aimed to identify whether integrative medicine options might attract different patients. Design and setting: In this cross-sectional, observational study we administered the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine-Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to 209 patients recruited from four hospital clinics. Demographics, use of different types of CAM (self-help CAM, CAM practitioners, CAM products), and motivations were compared between Kampo and Non-Kampo patients and by gender. Factors influencing attendance at the Kampo clinic and CAM use were identified using logistic regression. Results: While some demographic characteristics, CAM provider and total CAM use differed between Kampo and non-Kampo patients, self-help CAM use did not. Motivations (for acute, long-term, health maintenance, or other reasons) differed between Kampo and non-Kampo clinic patients for going to non-Kampo physicians (P = 0.02) and Kampo physicians (P = 0.1). Logistic regression results for ‘any CAM’ use showed odds ratio of 0.32 (95%CI 0.15-0.67) for self-rated health, and 1.60 (95%CI 1.10–2.32) for Macarthur subjective social status scale. Attendance at the Kampo clinic showed odds ratios of 1.50 (95%CI 1.11–2.02) for education and 0.56 (95%CI 0.39-0.80) for employment status. Conclusions: Better understanding of factors such as motivation, self-rated health, and socioeconomic conditions that influence patients’ CAM use and integrative clinic attendance may enable more effective targeting of populations and integration of CAM into biomedical settings.

AB - Objectives: Growing interest in integrative medicine motivates examination of who seeks integrative care, and why. By examining differences in demographics and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use between patients recruited from Japanese Kampo (traditional herbal medicine) versus biomedical clinics, this study aimed to identify whether integrative medicine options might attract different patients. Design and setting: In this cross-sectional, observational study we administered the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine-Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to 209 patients recruited from four hospital clinics. Demographics, use of different types of CAM (self-help CAM, CAM practitioners, CAM products), and motivations were compared between Kampo and Non-Kampo patients and by gender. Factors influencing attendance at the Kampo clinic and CAM use were identified using logistic regression. Results: While some demographic characteristics, CAM provider and total CAM use differed between Kampo and non-Kampo patients, self-help CAM use did not. Motivations (for acute, long-term, health maintenance, or other reasons) differed between Kampo and non-Kampo clinic patients for going to non-Kampo physicians (P = 0.02) and Kampo physicians (P = 0.1). Logistic regression results for ‘any CAM’ use showed odds ratio of 0.32 (95%CI 0.15-0.67) for self-rated health, and 1.60 (95%CI 1.10–2.32) for Macarthur subjective social status scale. Attendance at the Kampo clinic showed odds ratios of 1.50 (95%CI 1.11–2.02) for education and 0.56 (95%CI 0.39-0.80) for employment status. Conclusions: Better understanding of factors such as motivation, self-rated health, and socioeconomic conditions that influence patients’ CAM use and integrative clinic attendance may enable more effective targeting of populations and integration of CAM into biomedical settings.

KW - Complementary and alternative medicine

KW - Healthcare access

KW - Integrative medicine

KW - Kampo

KW - Patient-centered care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071486688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071486688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ctim.2019.06.003

DO - 10.1016/j.ctim.2019.06.003

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 202

EP - 209

JO - Complementary Therapies in Medicine

JF - Complementary Therapies in Medicine

SN - 0965-2299

ER -