Disclosure preferences regarding cancer diagnosis and prognosis

To tell or not to tell?

Hiroaki Miyata, M. Takahashi, T. Saito, H. Tachimori, I. Kai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Telling people that they have cancer has a great impact on their lives, so many doctors are concerned about how they should inform patients about a cancer diagnosis and its prognosis. We conducted a general population survey in Japan to investigate people's preferences on receiving this information. There were no significant differences in respondents' preferences according to the seriousness of the cancer. Full disclosure of the diagnosis was preferred by 86.1% of the respondents, while 2.7% wanted non-disclosure. As for the initial provision of information, the majority preferred partial disclosure concerning the prospects of complete recovery (64.5%) and the expected length of survival (64.1%). Those who responded negatively to the statement, "If I am close to the end of my life, I want to be informed of the fact so I can choose my own way of life", were more likely to want non-disclosure on diagnosis. The results suggest that, at the first opportunity of providing information, a disclosure policy of giving patients full details of their diagnosis and some information on prognosis can satisfy the preferences of most patients. Contrary to popular belief, the seriousness of the cancer and people's demographic characteristics displayed little impact in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-451
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Aug
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Disclosure
cancer
Neoplasms
Patient Preference
way of life
Japan
Demography
Survival
Cancer
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Disclosure preferences regarding cancer diagnosis and prognosis : To tell or not to tell? / Miyata, Hiroaki; Takahashi, M.; Saito, T.; Tachimori, H.; Kai, I.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 31, No. 8, 08.2005, p. 447-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miyata, Hiroaki ; Takahashi, M. ; Saito, T. ; Tachimori, H. ; Kai, I. / Disclosure preferences regarding cancer diagnosis and prognosis : To tell or not to tell?. In: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2005 ; Vol. 31, No. 8. pp. 447-451.
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