Divergent effects of active coping on psychological distress in the context of the job demands-control-support model: The roles of job control and social support

Akihito Shimazu, Miyuki Shimazu, Tsutomu Odara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of active coping on psychological distress in the context of the job demands-control-support model. Participants were 726 male nonmanagers in a large electrical company in Japan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine whether active coping and coping resources (job control, supervisor support, and coworker support) have interaction effects on psychological distress. Active coping had an interaction effect with coworker support, whereas it did not with job control and supervisor support. Results suggest that coworker support can facilitate the effectiveness of active coping, whereas job control or supervisor support cannot.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-198
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Aug 29
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Coping resource
  • Job control
  • Job demands-control-support model
  • Psychological distress
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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