Divergent renal vasodilator action of L- and T-type calcium antagonists in vivo

Masanori Honda, Koichi Hayashi, Hiroto Matsuda, Eiji Kubota, Hirobumi Tokuyama, Ken Okubo, Ichiro Takamatsu, Yuri Ozawa, Takao Saruta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the in-vivo action on the renal microvasculature of the calcium antagonists nifedipine (L-type blocker), efonidipine (L/T-type blocker), and mibefradil (predominant T-type blocker). Design: An intravital needle-type charge-coupled device (CCD) camera videomicroscope was introduced to visualize the renal microcirculation directly in vivo. Methods: In anesthetized mongrel dogs, nifedipine (0.01-1 mg/kg per min), efonidipine (0.033-0.33 mg/kg per min), or mibefradil (0.01-1 mg/kg per min) was infused intravenously after the insertion of a CCD probe into the kidney. Renal microvascular responses to calcium antagonists were directly evaluated, with concomitant observation of renal clearance. Results: Each calcium antagonist caused modest vasodepressor action without affecting heart rate. Nifedipine (1 mg/kg per rain, n = 9) increased renal plasma flow (RPF) (14 ± 4%, P < 0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (19 ± 5%, P < 0.05), and tended to increase the filtration fraction (5 ± 2% increment, P = 0.07). Efonidipine (0.33 mg/kg per min, n = 9), however, had no effect on filtration fraction, with 14 ± 6% increments in RPF (P < 0.05) and 14 ± 7% increments in GFR (P = 0.08). Rather, mibefradil (1 mg/kg per min, n = 9) elicited 6 ± 2% decreases in filtration fraction (P < 0.05), with slight increments in RPF (6 ± 3%) and no changes in GFR. In direct in-vivo microvasculature observations, nifedipine caused predominant (22 ± 2%) dilatation of afferent arterioles (from 15.5 ± 0.4 to 18.9 ± 0.4μm, n = 5), compared with that of efferent arterioles (10 ± 2%; from 11.0 ± 0.4 to 12.1 ± 0.3μm). In contrast, efonidipine caused a similar magnitude of vasodilatation (16 ± 4%) compared with 18 ± 2%; n = 6), and mibefradil caused greater dilatation of efferent arterioles (20 ± 4%, n = 7) than that of afferent arterioles (13 ± 4%). Conclusions: There exists marked heterogeneity in action of nifedipine, efonidipine and mibefradil on the renal microvascular in canine kidneys in vivo. Furthermore, our current observations suggest an important contribution of T-type calcium channel activity to efferent arteriolar tone in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2031-2037
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume19
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Mibefradil
Vasodilator Agents
Nifedipine
Calcium
Kidney
Arterioles
Renal Plasma Flow
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Microvessels
Dilatation
T-Type Calcium Channels
Equipment and Supplies
Rain
Microcirculation
Vasodilation
Needles
Canidae
Heart Rate
Observation
efonidipine

Keywords

  • Afferent arterioles
  • Efferent arterioles
  • Efonidipine
  • Mibefradil
  • Nifedipine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Divergent renal vasodilator action of L- and T-type calcium antagonists in vivo. / Honda, Masanori; Hayashi, Koichi; Matsuda, Hiroto; Kubota, Eiji; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Okubo, Ken; Takamatsu, Ichiro; Ozawa, Yuri; Saruta, Takao.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 19, No. 11, 2001, p. 2031-2037.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Honda, M, Hayashi, K, Matsuda, H, Kubota, E, Tokuyama, H, Okubo, K, Takamatsu, I, Ozawa, Y & Saruta, T 2001, 'Divergent renal vasodilator action of L- and T-type calcium antagonists in vivo', Journal of Hypertension, vol. 19, no. 11, pp. 2031-2037. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004872-200111000-00014
Honda, Masanori ; Hayashi, Koichi ; Matsuda, Hiroto ; Kubota, Eiji ; Tokuyama, Hirobumi ; Okubo, Ken ; Takamatsu, Ichiro ; Ozawa, Yuri ; Saruta, Takao. / Divergent renal vasodilator action of L- and T-type calcium antagonists in vivo. In: Journal of Hypertension. 2001 ; Vol. 19, No. 11. pp. 2031-2037.
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abstract = "Objective: To assess the in-vivo action on the renal microvasculature of the calcium antagonists nifedipine (L-type blocker), efonidipine (L/T-type blocker), and mibefradil (predominant T-type blocker). Design: An intravital needle-type charge-coupled device (CCD) camera videomicroscope was introduced to visualize the renal microcirculation directly in vivo. Methods: In anesthetized mongrel dogs, nifedipine (0.01-1 mg/kg per min), efonidipine (0.033-0.33 mg/kg per min), or mibefradil (0.01-1 mg/kg per min) was infused intravenously after the insertion of a CCD probe into the kidney. Renal microvascular responses to calcium antagonists were directly evaluated, with concomitant observation of renal clearance. Results: Each calcium antagonist caused modest vasodepressor action without affecting heart rate. Nifedipine (1 mg/kg per rain, n = 9) increased renal plasma flow (RPF) (14 ± 4{\%}, P < 0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (19 ± 5{\%}, P < 0.05), and tended to increase the filtration fraction (5 ± 2{\%} increment, P = 0.07). Efonidipine (0.33 mg/kg per min, n = 9), however, had no effect on filtration fraction, with 14 ± 6{\%} increments in RPF (P < 0.05) and 14 ± 7{\%} increments in GFR (P = 0.08). Rather, mibefradil (1 mg/kg per min, n = 9) elicited 6 ± 2{\%} decreases in filtration fraction (P < 0.05), with slight increments in RPF (6 ± 3{\%}) and no changes in GFR. In direct in-vivo microvasculature observations, nifedipine caused predominant (22 ± 2{\%}) dilatation of afferent arterioles (from 15.5 ± 0.4 to 18.9 ± 0.4μm, n = 5), compared with that of efferent arterioles (10 ± 2{\%}; from 11.0 ± 0.4 to 12.1 ± 0.3μm). In contrast, efonidipine caused a similar magnitude of vasodilatation (16 ± 4{\%}) compared with 18 ± 2{\%}; n = 6), and mibefradil caused greater dilatation of efferent arterioles (20 ± 4{\%}, n = 7) than that of afferent arterioles (13 ± 4{\%}). Conclusions: There exists marked heterogeneity in action of nifedipine, efonidipine and mibefradil on the renal microvascular in canine kidneys in vivo. Furthermore, our current observations suggest an important contribution of T-type calcium channel activity to efferent arteriolar tone in vivo.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Divergent renal vasodilator action of L- and T-type calcium antagonists in vivo

AU - Honda, Masanori

AU - Hayashi, Koichi

AU - Matsuda, Hiroto

AU - Kubota, Eiji

AU - Tokuyama, Hirobumi

AU - Okubo, Ken

AU - Takamatsu, Ichiro

AU - Ozawa, Yuri

AU - Saruta, Takao

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Objective: To assess the in-vivo action on the renal microvasculature of the calcium antagonists nifedipine (L-type blocker), efonidipine (L/T-type blocker), and mibefradil (predominant T-type blocker). Design: An intravital needle-type charge-coupled device (CCD) camera videomicroscope was introduced to visualize the renal microcirculation directly in vivo. Methods: In anesthetized mongrel dogs, nifedipine (0.01-1 mg/kg per min), efonidipine (0.033-0.33 mg/kg per min), or mibefradil (0.01-1 mg/kg per min) was infused intravenously after the insertion of a CCD probe into the kidney. Renal microvascular responses to calcium antagonists were directly evaluated, with concomitant observation of renal clearance. Results: Each calcium antagonist caused modest vasodepressor action without affecting heart rate. Nifedipine (1 mg/kg per rain, n = 9) increased renal plasma flow (RPF) (14 ± 4%, P < 0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (19 ± 5%, P < 0.05), and tended to increase the filtration fraction (5 ± 2% increment, P = 0.07). Efonidipine (0.33 mg/kg per min, n = 9), however, had no effect on filtration fraction, with 14 ± 6% increments in RPF (P < 0.05) and 14 ± 7% increments in GFR (P = 0.08). Rather, mibefradil (1 mg/kg per min, n = 9) elicited 6 ± 2% decreases in filtration fraction (P < 0.05), with slight increments in RPF (6 ± 3%) and no changes in GFR. In direct in-vivo microvasculature observations, nifedipine caused predominant (22 ± 2%) dilatation of afferent arterioles (from 15.5 ± 0.4 to 18.9 ± 0.4μm, n = 5), compared with that of efferent arterioles (10 ± 2%; from 11.0 ± 0.4 to 12.1 ± 0.3μm). In contrast, efonidipine caused a similar magnitude of vasodilatation (16 ± 4%) compared with 18 ± 2%; n = 6), and mibefradil caused greater dilatation of efferent arterioles (20 ± 4%, n = 7) than that of afferent arterioles (13 ± 4%). Conclusions: There exists marked heterogeneity in action of nifedipine, efonidipine and mibefradil on the renal microvascular in canine kidneys in vivo. Furthermore, our current observations suggest an important contribution of T-type calcium channel activity to efferent arteriolar tone in vivo.

AB - Objective: To assess the in-vivo action on the renal microvasculature of the calcium antagonists nifedipine (L-type blocker), efonidipine (L/T-type blocker), and mibefradil (predominant T-type blocker). Design: An intravital needle-type charge-coupled device (CCD) camera videomicroscope was introduced to visualize the renal microcirculation directly in vivo. Methods: In anesthetized mongrel dogs, nifedipine (0.01-1 mg/kg per min), efonidipine (0.033-0.33 mg/kg per min), or mibefradil (0.01-1 mg/kg per min) was infused intravenously after the insertion of a CCD probe into the kidney. Renal microvascular responses to calcium antagonists were directly evaluated, with concomitant observation of renal clearance. Results: Each calcium antagonist caused modest vasodepressor action without affecting heart rate. Nifedipine (1 mg/kg per rain, n = 9) increased renal plasma flow (RPF) (14 ± 4%, P < 0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (19 ± 5%, P < 0.05), and tended to increase the filtration fraction (5 ± 2% increment, P = 0.07). Efonidipine (0.33 mg/kg per min, n = 9), however, had no effect on filtration fraction, with 14 ± 6% increments in RPF (P < 0.05) and 14 ± 7% increments in GFR (P = 0.08). Rather, mibefradil (1 mg/kg per min, n = 9) elicited 6 ± 2% decreases in filtration fraction (P < 0.05), with slight increments in RPF (6 ± 3%) and no changes in GFR. In direct in-vivo microvasculature observations, nifedipine caused predominant (22 ± 2%) dilatation of afferent arterioles (from 15.5 ± 0.4 to 18.9 ± 0.4μm, n = 5), compared with that of efferent arterioles (10 ± 2%; from 11.0 ± 0.4 to 12.1 ± 0.3μm). In contrast, efonidipine caused a similar magnitude of vasodilatation (16 ± 4%) compared with 18 ± 2%; n = 6), and mibefradil caused greater dilatation of efferent arterioles (20 ± 4%, n = 7) than that of afferent arterioles (13 ± 4%). Conclusions: There exists marked heterogeneity in action of nifedipine, efonidipine and mibefradil on the renal microvascular in canine kidneys in vivo. Furthermore, our current observations suggest an important contribution of T-type calcium channel activity to efferent arteriolar tone in vivo.

KW - Afferent arterioles

KW - Efferent arterioles

KW - Efonidipine

KW - Mibefradil

KW - Nifedipine

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