Diversity in treatment modalities of Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan

Sub-analysis of the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association

Cancer Registration Committee of the Japanese Urological Association

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to survey treatment modalities for the patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan. Methods: We used the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association from 348 Japanese institutions, in which a total of 3707 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and 1538 with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were registered in 2008 and 2011, respectively. Primary treatment was classified as surgery alone, surgery with chemotherapy, surgery with radiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, combination of radiation and chemotherapy and observation. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival in the subgroups was analyzed using the log-rank test. Results: In Stage II/III bladder cancer patients, 49.7% of thosewere treated with radical operation and 22.3% received observation only. A total 97.2% of Stage II/III upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients treated with radical surgery. A total 30.4% of Stage II/III bladder cancer patients received chemotherapy. Majority of the patients received cisplatin-based regimen, however, regimens of chemotherapy was rich in variety up to 13 regimens. Chemotherapy regimens for the patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were also various up to eight regimens. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were statistically significantly stratified according to the clinical stage. The upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients diagnosed with clinical stage T3 had significantly poor prognosis compared with those diagnosed with clinical stage T2. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the variety of treatments used for Japanese patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer. Treatment standardization for these entities may be necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)468-474
Number of pages7
JournalJapanese Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Japan
Databases
Urinary Tract
Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Carcinoma
Therapeutics
Radiation
Survival
Observation
Combination Drug Therapy
Cisplatin
Muscles

Keywords

  • Japanese patients
  • Muscle-invasive bladder cancer
  • Survival
  • Treatment modality
  • Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Diversity in treatment modalities of Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan : Sub-analysis of the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association. / Cancer Registration Committee of the Japanese Urological Association.

In: Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 46, No. 5, 2016, p. 468-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Diversity in treatment modalities of Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan: Sub-analysis of the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association",
abstract = "Objective: We aimed to survey treatment modalities for the patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan. Methods: We used the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association from 348 Japanese institutions, in which a total of 3707 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and 1538 with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were registered in 2008 and 2011, respectively. Primary treatment was classified as surgery alone, surgery with chemotherapy, surgery with radiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, combination of radiation and chemotherapy and observation. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival in the subgroups was analyzed using the log-rank test. Results: In Stage II/III bladder cancer patients, 49.7{\%} of thosewere treated with radical operation and 22.3{\%} received observation only. A total 97.2{\%} of Stage II/III upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients treated with radical surgery. A total 30.4{\%} of Stage II/III bladder cancer patients received chemotherapy. Majority of the patients received cisplatin-based regimen, however, regimens of chemotherapy was rich in variety up to 13 regimens. Chemotherapy regimens for the patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were also various up to eight regimens. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were statistically significantly stratified according to the clinical stage. The upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients diagnosed with clinical stage T3 had significantly poor prognosis compared with those diagnosed with clinical stage T2. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the variety of treatments used for Japanese patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer. Treatment standardization for these entities may be necessary.",
keywords = "Japanese patients, Muscle-invasive bladder cancer, Survival, Treatment modality, Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma",
author = "{Cancer Registration Committee of the Japanese Urological Association} and Takuya Koie and Chikara Ohyama and Hiroyuki Fujimoto and Hiroyuki Nishiyama and Jun Miyazaki and Shiro Hinotsu and Eiji Kikuchi and Mizuaki Sakura and Junichi Inokuchi and Tomohiko Hara and Masato Fujisawa and Hirotsugu Uemura and Kazuhiro Suzuki and Masatoshi Eto and Seiji Naito and Isao Hara and Akio Matsubara and Norio Nonomura and Hiroyuki Nakanishi and Tsuneharu Miki and Hiroomi Kanayama and Tomoharu Fukumori",
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T1 - Diversity in treatment modalities of Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan

T2 - Sub-analysis of the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association

AU - Cancer Registration Committee of the Japanese Urological Association

AU - Koie, Takuya

AU - Ohyama, Chikara

AU - Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

AU - Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

AU - Miyazaki, Jun

AU - Hinotsu, Shiro

AU - Kikuchi, Eiji

AU - Sakura, Mizuaki

AU - Inokuchi, Junichi

AU - Hara, Tomohiko

AU - Fujisawa, Masato

AU - Uemura, Hirotsugu

AU - Suzuki, Kazuhiro

AU - Eto, Masatoshi

AU - Naito, Seiji

AU - Hara, Isao

AU - Matsubara, Akio

AU - Nonomura, Norio

AU - Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

AU - Miki, Tsuneharu

AU - Kanayama, Hiroomi

AU - Fukumori, Tomoharu

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Objective: We aimed to survey treatment modalities for the patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan. Methods: We used the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association from 348 Japanese institutions, in which a total of 3707 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and 1538 with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were registered in 2008 and 2011, respectively. Primary treatment was classified as surgery alone, surgery with chemotherapy, surgery with radiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, combination of radiation and chemotherapy and observation. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival in the subgroups was analyzed using the log-rank test. Results: In Stage II/III bladder cancer patients, 49.7% of thosewere treated with radical operation and 22.3% received observation only. A total 97.2% of Stage II/III upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients treated with radical surgery. A total 30.4% of Stage II/III bladder cancer patients received chemotherapy. Majority of the patients received cisplatin-based regimen, however, regimens of chemotherapy was rich in variety up to 13 regimens. Chemotherapy regimens for the patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were also various up to eight regimens. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were statistically significantly stratified according to the clinical stage. The upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients diagnosed with clinical stage T3 had significantly poor prognosis compared with those diagnosed with clinical stage T2. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the variety of treatments used for Japanese patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer. Treatment standardization for these entities may be necessary.

AB - Objective: We aimed to survey treatment modalities for the patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer in Japan. Methods: We used the multi-institutional national database of the Japanese Urological Association from 348 Japanese institutions, in which a total of 3707 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and 1538 with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were registered in 2008 and 2011, respectively. Primary treatment was classified as surgery alone, surgery with chemotherapy, surgery with radiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, combination of radiation and chemotherapy and observation. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival in the subgroups was analyzed using the log-rank test. Results: In Stage II/III bladder cancer patients, 49.7% of thosewere treated with radical operation and 22.3% received observation only. A total 97.2% of Stage II/III upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients treated with radical surgery. A total 30.4% of Stage II/III bladder cancer patients received chemotherapy. Majority of the patients received cisplatin-based regimen, however, regimens of chemotherapy was rich in variety up to 13 regimens. Chemotherapy regimens for the patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma were also various up to eight regimens. Overall and cancer-specific survivals were statistically significantly stratified according to the clinical stage. The upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma patients diagnosed with clinical stage T3 had significantly poor prognosis compared with those diagnosed with clinical stage T2. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the variety of treatments used for Japanese patients with Stage II/III urothelial cancer. Treatment standardization for these entities may be necessary.

KW - Japanese patients

KW - Muscle-invasive bladder cancer

KW - Survival

KW - Treatment modality

KW - Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma

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