Does Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) prevent major depressive episode for workers? A 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

K. Imamura, N. Kawakami, T. A. Furukawa, Y. Matsuyama, Akihito Shimazu, R. Umanodan, S. Kawakami, K. Kasai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background In this study we investigated whether an Internet-based computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) program can decrease the risk of DSM-IV-TR major depressive episodes (MDE) during a 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of Japanese workers. Method Participants were recruited from one company and three departments of another company. Those participants who did not experience MDE in the past month were randomly allocated to intervention or control groups (n = 381 for each). A 6-week, six-lesson iCBT program was provided to the intervention group. While the control group only received the usual preventive mental health service for the first 6 months, the control group was given a chance to undertake the iCBT program after a 6-month follow-up. The primary outcome was a new onset of DSM-IV-TR MDE during the 12-month follow-up, as assessed by means of the web version of the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), version 3.0 depression section. Results The intervention group had a significantly lower incidence of MDE at the 12-month follow-up than the control group (Log-rank χ2 = 7.04, p < 0.01). The hazard ratio for the intervention group was 0.22 (95% confidence interval 0.06-0.75), when estimated by the Cox proportional hazard model. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that an iCBT program is effective in preventing MDE in the working population. However, it should be noted that MDE was measured by self-report, while the CIDI can measure the episodes more strictly following DSM-IV criteria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1907-1917
Number of pages11
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Internet
Randomized Controlled Trials
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Control Groups
Preventive Health Services
Interviews
Mental Health Services
Proportional Hazards Models
Self Report
Confidence Intervals
Depression
Incidence
Population

Keywords

  • Depression
  • internet cognitive behavioral therapy
  • prevention
  • workers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Does Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) prevent major depressive episode for workers? A 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial. / Imamura, K.; Kawakami, N.; Furukawa, T. A.; Matsuyama, Y.; Shimazu, Akihito; Umanodan, R.; Kawakami, S.; Kasai, K.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 9, 01.07.2015, p. 1907-1917.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Imamura, K. ; Kawakami, N. ; Furukawa, T. A. ; Matsuyama, Y. ; Shimazu, Akihito ; Umanodan, R. ; Kawakami, S. ; Kasai, K. / Does Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) prevent major depressive episode for workers? A 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial. In: Psychological Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 45, No. 9. pp. 1907-1917.
@article{3e4c206e42714804ad709d53baacc6d2,
title = "Does Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) prevent major depressive episode for workers? A 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background In this study we investigated whether an Internet-based computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) program can decrease the risk of DSM-IV-TR major depressive episodes (MDE) during a 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of Japanese workers. Method Participants were recruited from one company and three departments of another company. Those participants who did not experience MDE in the past month were randomly allocated to intervention or control groups (n = 381 for each). A 6-week, six-lesson iCBT program was provided to the intervention group. While the control group only received the usual preventive mental health service for the first 6 months, the control group was given a chance to undertake the iCBT program after a 6-month follow-up. The primary outcome was a new onset of DSM-IV-TR MDE during the 12-month follow-up, as assessed by means of the web version of the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), version 3.0 depression section. Results The intervention group had a significantly lower incidence of MDE at the 12-month follow-up than the control group (Log-rank χ2 = 7.04, p < 0.01). The hazard ratio for the intervention group was 0.22 (95{\%} confidence interval 0.06-0.75), when estimated by the Cox proportional hazard model. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that an iCBT program is effective in preventing MDE in the working population. However, it should be noted that MDE was measured by self-report, while the CIDI can measure the episodes more strictly following DSM-IV criteria.",
keywords = "Depression, internet cognitive behavioral therapy, prevention, workers",
author = "K. Imamura and N. Kawakami and Furukawa, {T. A.} and Y. Matsuyama and Akihito Shimazu and R. Umanodan and S. Kawakami and K. Kasai",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291714003006",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "1907--1917",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) prevent major depressive episode for workers? A 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

AU - Imamura, K.

AU - Kawakami, N.

AU - Furukawa, T. A.

AU - Matsuyama, Y.

AU - Shimazu, Akihito

AU - Umanodan, R.

AU - Kawakami, S.

AU - Kasai, K.

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Background In this study we investigated whether an Internet-based computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) program can decrease the risk of DSM-IV-TR major depressive episodes (MDE) during a 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of Japanese workers. Method Participants were recruited from one company and three departments of another company. Those participants who did not experience MDE in the past month were randomly allocated to intervention or control groups (n = 381 for each). A 6-week, six-lesson iCBT program was provided to the intervention group. While the control group only received the usual preventive mental health service for the first 6 months, the control group was given a chance to undertake the iCBT program after a 6-month follow-up. The primary outcome was a new onset of DSM-IV-TR MDE during the 12-month follow-up, as assessed by means of the web version of the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), version 3.0 depression section. Results The intervention group had a significantly lower incidence of MDE at the 12-month follow-up than the control group (Log-rank χ2 = 7.04, p < 0.01). The hazard ratio for the intervention group was 0.22 (95% confidence interval 0.06-0.75), when estimated by the Cox proportional hazard model. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that an iCBT program is effective in preventing MDE in the working population. However, it should be noted that MDE was measured by self-report, while the CIDI can measure the episodes more strictly following DSM-IV criteria.

AB - Background In this study we investigated whether an Internet-based computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) program can decrease the risk of DSM-IV-TR major depressive episodes (MDE) during a 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of Japanese workers. Method Participants were recruited from one company and three departments of another company. Those participants who did not experience MDE in the past month were randomly allocated to intervention or control groups (n = 381 for each). A 6-week, six-lesson iCBT program was provided to the intervention group. While the control group only received the usual preventive mental health service for the first 6 months, the control group was given a chance to undertake the iCBT program after a 6-month follow-up. The primary outcome was a new onset of DSM-IV-TR MDE during the 12-month follow-up, as assessed by means of the web version of the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), version 3.0 depression section. Results The intervention group had a significantly lower incidence of MDE at the 12-month follow-up than the control group (Log-rank χ2 = 7.04, p < 0.01). The hazard ratio for the intervention group was 0.22 (95% confidence interval 0.06-0.75), when estimated by the Cox proportional hazard model. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that an iCBT program is effective in preventing MDE in the working population. However, it should be noted that MDE was measured by self-report, while the CIDI can measure the episodes more strictly following DSM-IV criteria.

KW - Depression

KW - internet cognitive behavioral therapy

KW - prevention

KW - workers

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930204020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930204020&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291714003006

DO - 10.1017/S0033291714003006

M3 - Article

C2 - 25562115

AN - SCOPUS:84930204020

VL - 45

SP - 1907

EP - 1917

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 9

ER -