Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections?

Rui Yamaguchi, Seiya Imoto, Masahiro Kami, Kenji Watanabe, Satoru Miyano, Koichiro Yuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. Methods and Findings: In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78%) of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26%) was smaller than the Forum effect (52%) in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. Conclusions: The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore information hidden in social phenomena.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere58252
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 6

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Kampo Medicine
Social Media
social networks
Time series
Internet
Insurance
Medicine
public opinion
Public Opinion
time series analysis
Oriental traditional medicine
East Asian Traditional Medicine
insurance
Traditional Medicine
Statistical Models
statistical models
medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Yamaguchi, R., Imoto, S., Kami, M., Watanabe, K., Miyano, S., & Yuji, K. (2013). Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections? PLoS One, 8(3), [e58252]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0058252

Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections? / Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Kami, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Miyano, Satoru; Yuji, Koichiro.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 3, e58252, 06.03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamaguchi, R, Imoto, S, Kami, M, Watanabe, K, Miyano, S & Yuji, K 2013, 'Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections?', PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 3, e58252. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0058252
Yamaguchi R, Imoto S, Kami M, Watanabe K, Miyano S, Yuji K. Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections? PLoS One. 2013 Mar 6;8(3). e58252. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0058252
Yamaguchi, Rui ; Imoto, Seiya ; Kami, Masahiro ; Watanabe, Kenji ; Miyano, Satoru ; Yuji, Koichiro. / Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections?. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 3.
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