Dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis

Ikuko Toda, Naoko Asano-Kato, Yoshiko Komai-Hori, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

210 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether patients undergoing laser in situ keratomileusis have postoperative dry eye. METHODS: In this retrospective, interventional case series, 124 eyes of 64 consecutive patients who underwent laser in situ keratomileusis were examined for a dry eye symptom, Schirmer test with anesthesia, tear clearance rate, tear break-up time, vital staining for ocular surface, corneal sensitivity, and blink rate. All values were compared before and after surgery (1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year) and values of P < .05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Subjective score for dryness was increased after laser in situ keratomileusis. Tear function index (Schirmer value/tear clearance rate) and break-up time were decreased until 1 month (tear function index) and 3 months (break-up time) after laser in situ keratomileusis but recovered to preoperative levels thereafter. Fluorescein and rose bengal scores were unchanged at all follow-up points except for improvement of the rose bengal score at 6 months. Corneal sensitivity was decreased at 1 month and 3 months, and returned to the preoperative level at 6 months after laser in situ keratomileusis. Blink rate was decreased at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after laser in situ keratomileusis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing laser in situ keratomileusis develop dry eye with compromised tear function for at least 1 month after surgery. Use of artificial tears in the early postoperative period may help to prevent unwanted symptoms and ocular surface damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume132
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Jul 12
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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