E-gaze glasses: Simulating natural gazes for blind people

Shi Qiu, Siti Aisyah Anas, Hirotaka Osawa, Matthias Rauterberg, Jun Hu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gaze and eye contact are frequently in social occasions used among sighted people. Gaze is considered as a predictor of attention and engagement between interlocutors in conversations. However, gaze signals from the sighted are not accessible for the blind person in face-to-face communication. In this paper, we present functional work-in-progress prototype, E-Gaze glasses, an assistive device based on an eye tracking system. E-Gaze simulates natural gaze for blind people, especially establishing the "eye contact" between blind and sighted people to enhance their engagement in face-to-face conversations. The gaze behavior is designed based on a turn-taking model, which interprets the corresponding relationship between the conclusive gaze behavior and the interlocutors' conversation flow.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTEI 2016 - Proceedings of the 10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages563-569
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450335829
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 14
Externally publishedYes
Event10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2016 - Eindhoven, Netherlands
Duration: 2016 Feb 142016 Feb 17

Publication series

NameTEI 2016 - Proceedings of the 10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction

Other

Other10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2016
Country/TerritoryNetherlands
CityEindhoven
Period16/2/1416/2/17

Keywords

  • Eye tracking
  • Social interaction
  • Visual impairments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Information Systems

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