Effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in patients with anxiety disorders in secondary-care settings: A randomized controlled trial

Akira Ninomiya, Mitsuhiro Sado, Sunre Park, Daisuke Fujisawa, Teppei Kosugi, Atsuo Nakagawa, Joichiro Shirahase, Masaru Mimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: The primary objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in secondary-care settings where the vast majority of the patients have already undergone pharmacotherapy but have not remitted. Methods: Eligible participants were aged between 20 and 75 years and met the criteria for panic disorder/agoraphobia or social anxiety disorder specified in the DSM-IV. They were randomly assigned to either the MBCT group (n = 20) or the wait-list control group (n = 20). The primary outcome was the difference in mean change scores between pre- and post-intervention assessments on the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The outcome was analyzed using an intent-to-treat approach and a mixed-effect model repeated measurement. Results: We observed significant differences in mean change scores for the STAI State Anxiety subscale (difference, −10.1; 95% confidence interval, −16.9 to −3.2; P < 0.005) and STAI Trait Anxiety subscale (difference, −11.7; 95% confidence interval, −17.0 to −6.4; P < 0.001) between the MBCT and control groups. Conclusion: MBCT is effective in patients with anxiety disorders in secondary-care settings where the vast majority of patients are treatment-resistant to pharmacotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)132-139
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb 1

Keywords

  • anxiety disorders
  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • mindfulness
  • randomized controlled trial
  • secondary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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