Effects of a public education campaign on the association between knowledge of early stroke symptoms and intention to call an ambulance at stroke onset: The acquisition of stroke knowledge (ASK) study

Tomofumi Nishikawa, Tomonori Okamura, Hirofumi Nakayama, Naomi Miyamatsu, Akiko Morimoto, Kazunori Toyoda, Kazuo Suzuki, Akihiro Toyota, Takashi Hata, Takenori Yamaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: An immediate ambulance call offers the greatest opportunity for acute stroke therapy. Effectively using ambulance services requires strengthening the association between knowledge of early stroke symptoms and intention to call an ambulance at stroke onset, and encouraging the public to use ambulance services. Methods: The present study utilized data from the Acquisition of Stroke Knowledge (ASK) study, which administered multiple-choice, mail-in surveys regarding awareness of early stroke symptoms and response to a stroke attack before and after a 2-year stroke education campaign in two areas subject to intensive and moderate intervention, as well as in a control area, in Japan. In these three areas, 3833 individuals (1680, 1088 and 1065 participants in intensive intervention, moderate intervention, and control areas, respectively), aged 40 to 74 years, who responded appropriately to each survey were included in the present study. Results: After the intervention, the number of correctly identified symptoms significantly associated with intention to call an ambulance (P <0.05) increased (eg, from 4 to 5 correctly identified symptoms), without increasing choice of decoy symptoms in the intensive intervention area. Meanwhile, in other areas, rate of identification of not only correct symptoms but also decoy symptoms associated with intention to call an ambulance increased. Furthermore, the association between improvement in the knowledge of stroke symptoms and intention to call an ambulance was observed only in the intensive intervention area (P = 0.009). Conclusions: Our results indicate that intensive interventions are useful for strengthening the association between correct knowledge of early stroke symptoms and intention to call an ambulance, without strengthening the association between incorrect knowledge and intention to call an ambulance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Epidemiology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Ambulances
Stroke
Education
Postal Service
Japan

Keywords

  • Ambulance call
  • Early stroke symptoms
  • Knowledge
  • Public education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Effects of a public education campaign on the association between knowledge of early stroke symptoms and intention to call an ambulance at stroke onset : The acquisition of stroke knowledge (ASK) study. / Nishikawa, Tomofumi; Okamura, Tomonori; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Morimoto, Akiko; Toyoda, Kazunori; Suzuki, Kazuo; Toyota, Akihiro; Hata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takenori.

In: Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2016, p. 115-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nishikawa, Tomofumi ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Nakayama, Hirofumi ; Miyamatsu, Naomi ; Morimoto, Akiko ; Toyoda, Kazunori ; Suzuki, Kazuo ; Toyota, Akihiro ; Hata, Takashi ; Yamaguchi, Takenori. / Effects of a public education campaign on the association between knowledge of early stroke symptoms and intention to call an ambulance at stroke onset : The acquisition of stroke knowledge (ASK) study. In: Journal of Epidemiology. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 115-122.
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