Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on vascular hyperpermeability with thermal injury in mice

H. Inoue, K. Ando, N. Wakisaka, K. I. Matsuzaki, M. Aihara, N. Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of nitric oxide and related synthase in thermal injury was investigated by using models of experimental burn to evaluate severity from the aspect of vascular permeability. Thermal injuries were produced in the murine right ear by pinching with a pair of preheated tweezers. Immediately thereafter, Evans blue dye was intravenously administered, and the mice injured with burns were sacrificed at various times. The burned ears were collected and hydrolyzed, and the level of extracted dye was measured as an indicator of inflammation. Vascular hyperpermeability was suppressed by the administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. LNAME not only suppressed vascular hyperpermeability in thermal injuries in a dose-dependent manner but was also effective with either prophylactic or therapeutic administration. Although aminoguanidine also suppressed the inflammatory response, it had no effect on the early inflammatory phase. Nitric oxide synthase is well known to have two types of isozymes. Aminoguanidine, an inhibitor specific to inducible nitric oxide synthase, suppressed the late phase 6 h after injury, suggesting that inducible nitric oxide synthase is involved in inflammatory responses of thermal injuries. These results also demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase-like protein stained the burned region immunohistochemically. Therefore, both types of enzymes mediating nitric oxide affect inflammatory responses, i.e., vascular hyperpermeability, and their regulation may lead to the development of new therapy for thermal injuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)334-342
Number of pages9
JournalNitric Oxide - Biology and Chemistry
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nitric Oxide Synthase
Blood Vessels
Hot Temperature
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Wounds and Injuries
Nitric Oxide
Coloring Agents
Ear
Evans Blue
Isoenzymes
Capillary Permeability
Burns
Theoretical Models
Inflammation
Enzymes
Therapeutics
Proteins
pimagedine

Keywords

  • Aminoguanidine
  • LNAME
  • Nitric oxide synthase
  • Thermal injury
  • Vascular permeability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on vascular hyperpermeability with thermal injury in mice. / Inoue, H.; Ando, K.; Wakisaka, N.; Matsuzaki, K. I.; Aihara, M.; Kumagai, N.

In: Nitric Oxide - Biology and Chemistry, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2001, p. 334-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inoue, H. ; Ando, K. ; Wakisaka, N. ; Matsuzaki, K. I. ; Aihara, M. ; Kumagai, N. / Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on vascular hyperpermeability with thermal injury in mice. In: Nitric Oxide - Biology and Chemistry. 2001 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 334-342.
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