Effects of stress management program for teachers in Japan: A pilot study

Akihito Shimazu, Yusuke Okada, Mitsumi Sakamoto, Masae Miura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a stress management program for teachers on their stress responses, social support, and coping. Participants (n=24) were assigned to either an intervention or a waiting list control group. A five-session program, including psychoeducation, group discussion, role-playing and relaxation training, was conducted for the intervention group at two week intervals. Eight participants from each of the groups responded to pre- and post-intervention questionnaire surveys. The positive intervention effect was significant for social support from co-workers (p=0.035), whereas the negative intervention effect was significant for proactive coping (p=0.033). No significant effect was observed for stress responses (vigor, anger, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and somatic stress responses) (p>0.05). The positive intervention effect was marginally significant for social support from co-workers (p=0.085) and anger (p=0.057) among those who at first had high stress response scores in the pre-intervention survey (n=5 and n=4 for the intervention and waiting list control groups, respectively). Furthermore, the positive intervention effect was significant for social support from co-workers (p=0.021) and marginally significant for resignation coping (p=0.070) among those who at first had high job control scores (n=4 and n=5 for the intervention and waiting list control groups, respectively). Results showed that the stress management program conducted in this study contributed to increasing social support from co-workers. This study suggests that a program that focuses on a particular subgroup (e.g., those with high stress responses or high job control) might be effective in enhancing coping skills, increasing social support, and reducing stress responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-208
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of occupational health
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Support
Japan
Waiting Lists
Anger
Control Groups
Role Playing
Psychological Adaptation
Fatigue
Fatigue of materials
Anxiety
Depression
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral training
  • Coping
  • Job control
  • Psychological stress model
  • Relaxation training
  • Social support
  • Stress management
  • Stress response
  • Teacher

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of stress management program for teachers in Japan : A pilot study. / Shimazu, Akihito; Okada, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Mitsumi; Miura, Masae.

In: Journal of occupational health, Vol. 45, No. 4, 01.07.2003, p. 202-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shimazu, Akihito ; Okada, Yusuke ; Sakamoto, Mitsumi ; Miura, Masae. / Effects of stress management program for teachers in Japan : A pilot study. In: Journal of occupational health. 2003 ; Vol. 45, No. 4. pp. 202-208.
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