Effects of therapeutic gait training using a prosthesis and a treadmill for ambulatory patients with hemiparesis

Kimitaka Hase, Etsuko Suzuki, Maiko Matsumoto, Toshiyuki Fujiwara, Meigen Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the short-term effects of a newly developed hemiparetic gait training in which patients walk with a prosthesis applied to the nonparetic leg in the flexed knee position. Design: Pre-post nonrandomized controlled trial. Setting: Rehabilitation center and gait laboratory of a university hospital. Participants: Community-dwelling ambulatory volunteers (N=22) with chronic hemiparesis caused by a unilateral stroke. Intervention: Study subjects participated in a gait training program using either a below-knee prosthesis or a treadmill. Treadmill gait training was performed at a speed approximating the maximum gait velocity for each patient. The 3-week program consisted of a 5-minute gait training session 2 to 3 times a day. Main Outcome Measures: The ground reaction forces, stance time, step length and cadence during walking at a comfortable speed, and maximum gait speed, as well as the Berg Balance Score, were estimated before and after each training program. Results: In comparison with changes after the treadmill gait training, analyses of covariance demonstrated a significant increase of the fore-aft ground reaction forces during the paretic propulsion phase and a significant increase in the relative durations of the paretic and nonparetic single stance involved in a gait cycle after the prosthetic gait training (P<.05). Conclusions: Prosthetic gait training would have different effects on a hemiparetic gait than treadmill gait training. The gait-related task inducing the dominant use of the paretic leg to support the body may be useful as a rehabilitative treatment to improve the kinetic abilities in the paretic stance period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1961-1966
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume92
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec

Fingerprint

Therapeutic Uses
Paresis
Gait
Prostheses and Implants
Leg
Knee Prosthesis
Independent Living
Education
Rehabilitation Centers
Walking
Volunteers
Knee
Stroke
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Gait
  • Paresis
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of therapeutic gait training using a prosthesis and a treadmill for ambulatory patients with hemiparesis. / Hase, Kimitaka; Suzuki, Etsuko; Matsumoto, Maiko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Liu, Meigen.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 92, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 1961-1966.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hase, Kimitaka ; Suzuki, Etsuko ; Matsumoto, Maiko ; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki ; Liu, Meigen. / Effects of therapeutic gait training using a prosthesis and a treadmill for ambulatory patients with hemiparesis. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2011 ; Vol. 92, No. 12. pp. 1961-1966.
@article{36428e0e139e47e9a2285bdff1875e25,
title = "Effects of therapeutic gait training using a prosthesis and a treadmill for ambulatory patients with hemiparesis",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the short-term effects of a newly developed hemiparetic gait training in which patients walk with a prosthesis applied to the nonparetic leg in the flexed knee position. Design: Pre-post nonrandomized controlled trial. Setting: Rehabilitation center and gait laboratory of a university hospital. Participants: Community-dwelling ambulatory volunteers (N=22) with chronic hemiparesis caused by a unilateral stroke. Intervention: Study subjects participated in a gait training program using either a below-knee prosthesis or a treadmill. Treadmill gait training was performed at a speed approximating the maximum gait velocity for each patient. The 3-week program consisted of a 5-minute gait training session 2 to 3 times a day. Main Outcome Measures: The ground reaction forces, stance time, step length and cadence during walking at a comfortable speed, and maximum gait speed, as well as the Berg Balance Score, were estimated before and after each training program. Results: In comparison with changes after the treadmill gait training, analyses of covariance demonstrated a significant increase of the fore-aft ground reaction forces during the paretic propulsion phase and a significant increase in the relative durations of the paretic and nonparetic single stance involved in a gait cycle after the prosthetic gait training (P<.05). Conclusions: Prosthetic gait training would have different effects on a hemiparetic gait than treadmill gait training. The gait-related task inducing the dominant use of the paretic leg to support the body may be useful as a rehabilitative treatment to improve the kinetic abilities in the paretic stance period.",
keywords = "Gait, Paresis, Rehabilitation",
author = "Kimitaka Hase and Etsuko Suzuki and Maiko Matsumoto and Toshiyuki Fujiwara and Meigen Liu",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.apmr.2011.07.005",
language = "English",
volume = "92",
pages = "1961--1966",
journal = "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0003-9993",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of therapeutic gait training using a prosthesis and a treadmill for ambulatory patients with hemiparesis

AU - Hase, Kimitaka

AU - Suzuki, Etsuko

AU - Matsumoto, Maiko

AU - Fujiwara, Toshiyuki

AU - Liu, Meigen

PY - 2011/12

Y1 - 2011/12

N2 - Objective: To examine the short-term effects of a newly developed hemiparetic gait training in which patients walk with a prosthesis applied to the nonparetic leg in the flexed knee position. Design: Pre-post nonrandomized controlled trial. Setting: Rehabilitation center and gait laboratory of a university hospital. Participants: Community-dwelling ambulatory volunteers (N=22) with chronic hemiparesis caused by a unilateral stroke. Intervention: Study subjects participated in a gait training program using either a below-knee prosthesis or a treadmill. Treadmill gait training was performed at a speed approximating the maximum gait velocity for each patient. The 3-week program consisted of a 5-minute gait training session 2 to 3 times a day. Main Outcome Measures: The ground reaction forces, stance time, step length and cadence during walking at a comfortable speed, and maximum gait speed, as well as the Berg Balance Score, were estimated before and after each training program. Results: In comparison with changes after the treadmill gait training, analyses of covariance demonstrated a significant increase of the fore-aft ground reaction forces during the paretic propulsion phase and a significant increase in the relative durations of the paretic and nonparetic single stance involved in a gait cycle after the prosthetic gait training (P<.05). Conclusions: Prosthetic gait training would have different effects on a hemiparetic gait than treadmill gait training. The gait-related task inducing the dominant use of the paretic leg to support the body may be useful as a rehabilitative treatment to improve the kinetic abilities in the paretic stance period.

AB - Objective: To examine the short-term effects of a newly developed hemiparetic gait training in which patients walk with a prosthesis applied to the nonparetic leg in the flexed knee position. Design: Pre-post nonrandomized controlled trial. Setting: Rehabilitation center and gait laboratory of a university hospital. Participants: Community-dwelling ambulatory volunteers (N=22) with chronic hemiparesis caused by a unilateral stroke. Intervention: Study subjects participated in a gait training program using either a below-knee prosthesis or a treadmill. Treadmill gait training was performed at a speed approximating the maximum gait velocity for each patient. The 3-week program consisted of a 5-minute gait training session 2 to 3 times a day. Main Outcome Measures: The ground reaction forces, stance time, step length and cadence during walking at a comfortable speed, and maximum gait speed, as well as the Berg Balance Score, were estimated before and after each training program. Results: In comparison with changes after the treadmill gait training, analyses of covariance demonstrated a significant increase of the fore-aft ground reaction forces during the paretic propulsion phase and a significant increase in the relative durations of the paretic and nonparetic single stance involved in a gait cycle after the prosthetic gait training (P<.05). Conclusions: Prosthetic gait training would have different effects on a hemiparetic gait than treadmill gait training. The gait-related task inducing the dominant use of the paretic leg to support the body may be useful as a rehabilitative treatment to improve the kinetic abilities in the paretic stance period.

KW - Gait

KW - Paresis

KW - Rehabilitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=82455195033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=82455195033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.apmr.2011.07.005

DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2011.07.005

M3 - Article

C2 - 22133242

AN - SCOPUS:82455195033

VL - 92

SP - 1961

EP - 1966

JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

IS - 12

ER -