Effects of viewing multiple viewpoint videos on metacognition of collaborative experiences

Yasuyuki Sumi, Masaki Suwa, Koichi Hanaue

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper discusses the effects of multiple viewpoint videos for metacognition of experiences. We present a system for recording multiple users' collaborative experiences by wearable and environmental sensors, and another system for viewing multiple viewpoint videos automatically identified and extracted to associate to individual users. We designed an experiment to compare the metacognition of one's own experience between those based on memory and those supported by video viewing. The experimental results show that metacognitive descriptions related to one's own mind, such as feelings and preferences, are possible regardless whether a person is viewing videos, but such episodic descriptions as the content of someone's utterance and what s/he felt associated with it are strongly promoted by video viewing. We conducted another experiment where the same participants did identical metacognitive description tasks about half a year after the previous experiment. Through the experiments, we found the first-person view video is mostly used for confirming the episodic facts immediately after the experience, whereas after half a year, even one's own experience is often felt like the experiences of others therefore the videos capturing themselves from the conversation partners and environment become important for thinking back to the situations where they were placed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2018 - Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Subtitle of host publicationEngage with CHI
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Volume2018-April
ISBN (Electronic)9781450356206, 9781450356213
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 20
Event2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2018 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: 2018 Apr 212018 Apr 26

Other

Other2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2018
CountryCanada
CityMontreal
Period18/4/2118/4/26

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Experiments
Data storage equipment
Sensors

Keywords

  • Experience capturing
  • Metacognition
  • Multiple viewpoint videos

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

Sumi, Y., Suwa, M., & Hanaue, K. (2018). Effects of viewing multiple viewpoint videos on metacognition of collaborative experiences. In CHI 2018 - Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Engage with CHI (Vol. 2018-April). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3173574.3174222

Effects of viewing multiple viewpoint videos on metacognition of collaborative experiences. / Sumi, Yasuyuki; Suwa, Masaki; Hanaue, Koichi.

CHI 2018 - Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Engage with CHI. Vol. 2018-April Association for Computing Machinery, 2018.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sumi, Y, Suwa, M & Hanaue, K 2018, Effects of viewing multiple viewpoint videos on metacognition of collaborative experiences. in CHI 2018 - Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Engage with CHI. vol. 2018-April, Association for Computing Machinery, 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2018, Montreal, Canada, 18/4/21. https://doi.org/10.1145/3173574.3174222
Sumi Y, Suwa M, Hanaue K. Effects of viewing multiple viewpoint videos on metacognition of collaborative experiences. In CHI 2018 - Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Engage with CHI. Vol. 2018-April. Association for Computing Machinery. 2018 https://doi.org/10.1145/3173574.3174222
Sumi, Yasuyuki ; Suwa, Masaki ; Hanaue, Koichi. / Effects of viewing multiple viewpoint videos on metacognition of collaborative experiences. CHI 2018 - Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Engage with CHI. Vol. 2018-April Association for Computing Machinery, 2018.
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