Efficacy and Acceptability of Remote Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Patients With Major Depressive Disorder in Japanese Clinical Settings: A Case Series

Waka Nogami, Atsuo Nakagawa, Noriko Kato, Yohei Sasaki, Taishiro Kishimoto, Masaru Horikoshi, Masaru Mimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Remote cognitive and behavioral therapy (CBT) via videoconference has been garnering attention as a means of improving access to CBT for depression, in particular during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. However, there is a lack of evidence supporting its implementation in Japanese clinical settings. This case series aimed to establish preliminary evidence of whether remote CBT can be an effective therapy for major depression in Japanese clinical settings. Five patients who met the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder were enrolled and underwent remote CBT via videoconference and face-to-face assessment interviews. The results showed that remote CBT via videoconference improved depressive symptoms, enabling a relatively high level of patient satisfaction and working alliance. Moreover, detailed feedback from our patients showed that continuous monitoring was preferable for increasing treatment engagement. Further research is warranted to test the efficacy and acceptability of remote CBT via videoconference for treating major depression.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Practice
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • depression
  • teletherapy
  • videoconference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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