Efficacy and safety of cyclosporine A in patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus in a daily clinical practice

H. Ogawa, H. Kameda, K. Amano, Tsutomu Takeuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the efficacy and safety of cyclosporine A (CsA; targeted serum trough level: 80-150 ng/ml) in a daily clinical practice for treating patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), who had been, or were expected to be, refractory to glucocorticoids (GCs) and other immunosuppressants. Fifty-nine patients with SLE receiving CsA were observed for at least 6 months (21.5 months on average). A significant reduction of proteinuria was noted 2 weeks after initiation of treatment in patients with nephritis, resulting in a clinical response in five of eight patients in the GC dose-up group and 11 of 18 patients in the stable GC dose group, respectively. Notably, the mean score for disease activity on the SLE Disease Activity Index decreased significantly from 8.6 ± 5.3 to 4.4 ± 2.5 after CsA treatment in patients in the stable GC dose group (n = 40). Moreover, the mean flare rate decreased by approximately 60% with CsA. Side effects of CsA appeared in 32.2% of patients and all of them subsided through dose reduction or discontinuation (n=8) of CsA. Consequently, the cumulative 2-year survival rate of CsA was 75%. The results suggest that CsA should be considered for patients with SLE refractory to GCs. Lupus (2010) 19, 162-169.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-169
Number of pages8
JournalLupus
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Feb
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Cyclosporine
Safety
Glucocorticoids
Nephritis
Immunosuppressive Agents
Proteinuria
Survival Rate
Therapeutics
Serum

Keywords

  • Glucocorticoids
  • Immunosuppressants
  • Lupus nephritis
  • SLEDAI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Efficacy and safety of cyclosporine A in patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus in a daily clinical practice. / Ogawa, H.; Kameda, H.; Amano, K.; Takeuchi, Tsutomu.

In: Lupus, Vol. 19, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 162-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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