Efficacy and safety of infrared warming of the eyelids

Asako Mori, Yoshihisa Oguchi, Eiki Goto, Katsu Nakamori, Tomohiro Ohtsuki, Fuminobu Egami, Jun Shimazaki, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To evaluate our newly developed infrared heater (IRH) and compare it to a broad-spectrum heater (BSH) for warming the eyelids. Materials and Methods. Ten normal subjects were enrolled in this study. All measurements were recorded in a room with temperature 23°C, 40% humidity, and no wind. The IRH is composed of two hard eye patches that have light- emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting near-infrared radiation. We first compared the temperature rises in the cornea, lacrimal gland, and eyelids after warming through closed eyelids with the IRH for 5 and 10 min. Next, we compared warming with the IRH or BSH for 30 min. We then used the IRH for 5 min with the eyes open to confirm its safety. Finally, we determined subjective feeling after warming the eyes. Results. Direct comparison of 5 versus 10 min of warming with the IRH showed no significant differences in temperature rises in the upper eyelid (p = 0.09). The IRH caused significantly more heating (p < 0.05) than did the BSH everywhere except the cornea. The temperatures never rose above 37.7°C for either heater during 30 min or with the IRH with the eyes open for 5 min. The subjects' comfort level rose significantly (p < 0.05) after treatment with the IRH. Conclusions. Our study showed the efficacy and safety of warming the eyelids with a newly developed IRH. Only 5 min is necessary to increase ocular temperature and enhance comfort.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-193
Number of pages6
JournalCornea
Volume18
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Mar

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Eyelids
Safety
Temperature
Cornea
Lacrimal Apparatus
Humidity
Heating
Emotions
Radiation
Light

Keywords

  • Dry eye
  • Hyperthermia
  • Infrared radiation
  • Meibomian gland dysfunction
  • Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Mori, A., Oguchi, Y., Goto, E., Nakamori, K., Ohtsuki, T., Egami, F., ... Tsubota, K. (1999). Efficacy and safety of infrared warming of the eyelids. Cornea, 18(2), 188-193.

Efficacy and safety of infrared warming of the eyelids. / Mori, Asako; Oguchi, Yoshihisa; Goto, Eiki; Nakamori, Katsu; Ohtsuki, Tomohiro; Egami, Fuminobu; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsubota, Kazuo.

In: Cornea, Vol. 18, No. 2, 03.1999, p. 188-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mori, A, Oguchi, Y, Goto, E, Nakamori, K, Ohtsuki, T, Egami, F, Shimazaki, J & Tsubota, K 1999, 'Efficacy and safety of infrared warming of the eyelids', Cornea, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 188-193.
Mori A, Oguchi Y, Goto E, Nakamori K, Ohtsuki T, Egami F et al. Efficacy and safety of infrared warming of the eyelids. Cornea. 1999 Mar;18(2):188-193.
Mori, Asako ; Oguchi, Yoshihisa ; Goto, Eiki ; Nakamori, Katsu ; Ohtsuki, Tomohiro ; Egami, Fuminobu ; Shimazaki, Jun ; Tsubota, Kazuo. / Efficacy and safety of infrared warming of the eyelids. In: Cornea. 1999 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 188-193.
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abstract = "Purpose. To evaluate our newly developed infrared heater (IRH) and compare it to a broad-spectrum heater (BSH) for warming the eyelids. Materials and Methods. Ten normal subjects were enrolled in this study. All measurements were recorded in a room with temperature 23°C, 40{\%} humidity, and no wind. The IRH is composed of two hard eye patches that have light- emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting near-infrared radiation. We first compared the temperature rises in the cornea, lacrimal gland, and eyelids after warming through closed eyelids with the IRH for 5 and 10 min. Next, we compared warming with the IRH or BSH for 30 min. We then used the IRH for 5 min with the eyes open to confirm its safety. Finally, we determined subjective feeling after warming the eyes. Results. Direct comparison of 5 versus 10 min of warming with the IRH showed no significant differences in temperature rises in the upper eyelid (p = 0.09). The IRH caused significantly more heating (p < 0.05) than did the BSH everywhere except the cornea. The temperatures never rose above 37.7°C for either heater during 30 min or with the IRH with the eyes open for 5 min. The subjects' comfort level rose significantly (p < 0.05) after treatment with the IRH. Conclusions. Our study showed the efficacy and safety of warming the eyelids with a newly developed IRH. Only 5 min is necessary to increase ocular temperature and enhance comfort.",
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AU - Shimazaki, Jun

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