Efficacy of a vibrotactile neurofeedback training in stance and gait conditions for the treatment of balance deficits: A double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study

Dietmar Basta, Marcos Rossi-Izquierdo, Andrés Soto-Varela, Mario Edwin Greters, Roseli Saraiva Bittar, Elisabeth Steinhagen-Thiessen, Rahel Eckardt, Tatsuhiko Harada, Fumiyuki Goto, Kaoru Ogawa, Arne Ernst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Vestibular rehabilitation strategies mostly require a long-lasting training in stance conditions, which is finally not always successful. The individualized training in everyday-life conditions with an intuitive tactile neurofeedback stimulus seems to be a more promising approach. Hence, the present study was aimed at investigating the efficacy of a new vibrotactile neurofeedback system for vestibular rehabilitation. Study Design: Double-blinded trial. Patients: One hundred five patients who experience one of the following balance disorders for more than 12 months were included in the study: canal paresis, otolith disorder, removal of an acoustic neuroma, microvascular compression syndrome, Parkinson's disease, and presbyvertigo. Interventions: Vibrotactile neurofeedback training was performed daily (15 min) over 2 weeks with the Vertiguard system in those 6 tasks of the Standard Balance Deficit Test with the most prominent deviations from the normative values. Main Outcome Measures Trunk and ankle sway, dizziness handicap inventory, and vestibular symptom score were measured in the verum and placebo group before the training, on the last training day and 3 months later. Results: A significant reduction in trunk and ankle sway as well as in the subjective symptom scores were observed in the verum group. Such an effect could not be found in any of the outcome parameters of the placebo group. Conclusion: The vibrotactile neurofeedback training applied in the present study is a highly efficient method for the reduction of body sway in different balance disorders. Because the rehabilitation program is easy to perform, not exhausting, and time saving, elderly patients and those with serious, long-lasting balance problems also can participate successfully.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1492-1499
Number of pages8
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume32
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec

Fingerprint

Neurofeedback
Gait
Multicenter Studies
Placebos
Rehabilitation
Ankle
Otolithic Membrane
Acoustic Neuroma
Touch
Dizziness
Paresis
Therapeutics
Parkinson Disease
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Efficacy of a vibrotactile neurofeedback training in stance and gait conditions for the treatment of balance deficits : A double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study. / Basta, Dietmar; Rossi-Izquierdo, Marcos; Soto-Varela, Andrés; Greters, Mario Edwin; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Eckardt, Rahel; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Goto, Fumiyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru; Ernst, Arne.

In: Otology and Neurotology, Vol. 32, No. 9, 12.2011, p. 1492-1499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Basta, D, Rossi-Izquierdo, M, Soto-Varela, A, Greters, ME, Bittar, RS, Steinhagen-Thiessen, E, Eckardt, R, Harada, T, Goto, F, Ogawa, K & Ernst, A 2011, 'Efficacy of a vibrotactile neurofeedback training in stance and gait conditions for the treatment of balance deficits: A double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study', Otology and Neurotology, vol. 32, no. 9, pp. 1492-1499. https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31823827ec
Basta, Dietmar ; Rossi-Izquierdo, Marcos ; Soto-Varela, Andrés ; Greters, Mario Edwin ; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva ; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth ; Eckardt, Rahel ; Harada, Tatsuhiko ; Goto, Fumiyuki ; Ogawa, Kaoru ; Ernst, Arne. / Efficacy of a vibrotactile neurofeedback training in stance and gait conditions for the treatment of balance deficits : A double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study. In: Otology and Neurotology. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 9. pp. 1492-1499.
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