Efficiency of Go/No-Go task performance implemented in the left Hemisphere

Satoshi Hirose, Junichi Chikazoe, Takamitsu Watanabe, Koji Jimura, Akira Kunimatsu, Osamu Abe, Kuni Ohtomo, Yasushi Miyashita, Seiki Konishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well known that the efficiency of response inhibition differs from person to person, but the neural mechanism that implements the efficiency is less understood. In the present fMRI study, we devised an index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition in the go/ no-go task, and investigated the neural correlates of the efficiency of response inhibition. The human subjects who perform the go/no-go task with a shorter reaction time in go trials (Go-RT) and with a higher percentage of correct no-go trials (Nogo-PC) are thought to have the ability to conduct response inhibition more efficiently. To quantify the efficiency, we defined an efficiency index as the difference in the Nogo-PC between each subject and an ordinarily efficient subject, under the same Go-RT. An across-subject correlation analysis revealed that the brain activity in multiple regions in the left frontal and parietal cortex positively correlated with the efficiency index. Moreover, a test of hemispheric asymmetry with regard to the across-subject correlation revealed left-hemispheric dominance. The significant correlation in the left frontal and parietal regions complements the results of previous studies that used the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT), a well known index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition used in the stop-signal task. Our results also indicate that, although it is well known that the neural substrates for response inhibition common in a subject group exist dominantly in the right hemisphere, the neural substrates for efficiency exist dominantly in the left hemisphere.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9059-9065
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume32
Issue number26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun 27
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Task Performance and Analysis
Efficiency
Parietal Lobe
Reaction Time
Aptitude
Frontal Lobe
Inhibition (Psychology)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Hirose, S., Chikazoe, J., Watanabe, T., Jimura, K., Kunimatsu, A., Abe, O., ... Konishi, S. (2012). Efficiency of Go/No-Go task performance implemented in the left Hemisphere. Journal of Neuroscience, 32(26), 9059-9065. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0540-12.2012

Efficiency of Go/No-Go task performance implemented in the left Hemisphere. / Hirose, Satoshi; Chikazoe, Junichi; Watanabe, Takamitsu; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 32, No. 26, 27.06.2012, p. 9059-9065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirose, S, Chikazoe, J, Watanabe, T, Jimura, K, Kunimatsu, A, Abe, O, Ohtomo, K, Miyashita, Y & Konishi, S 2012, 'Efficiency of Go/No-Go task performance implemented in the left Hemisphere', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 32, no. 26, pp. 9059-9065. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0540-12.2012
Hirose, Satoshi ; Chikazoe, Junichi ; Watanabe, Takamitsu ; Jimura, Koji ; Kunimatsu, Akira ; Abe, Osamu ; Ohtomo, Kuni ; Miyashita, Yasushi ; Konishi, Seiki. / Efficiency of Go/No-Go task performance implemented in the left Hemisphere. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2012 ; Vol. 32, No. 26. pp. 9059-9065.
@article{fe84bf206a774f798cbc3e8537e5a175,
title = "Efficiency of Go/No-Go task performance implemented in the left Hemisphere",
abstract = "It is well known that the efficiency of response inhibition differs from person to person, but the neural mechanism that implements the efficiency is less understood. In the present fMRI study, we devised an index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition in the go/ no-go task, and investigated the neural correlates of the efficiency of response inhibition. The human subjects who perform the go/no-go task with a shorter reaction time in go trials (Go-RT) and with a higher percentage of correct no-go trials (Nogo-PC) are thought to have the ability to conduct response inhibition more efficiently. To quantify the efficiency, we defined an efficiency index as the difference in the Nogo-PC between each subject and an ordinarily efficient subject, under the same Go-RT. An across-subject correlation analysis revealed that the brain activity in multiple regions in the left frontal and parietal cortex positively correlated with the efficiency index. Moreover, a test of hemispheric asymmetry with regard to the across-subject correlation revealed left-hemispheric dominance. The significant correlation in the left frontal and parietal regions complements the results of previous studies that used the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT), a well known index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition used in the stop-signal task. Our results also indicate that, although it is well known that the neural substrates for response inhibition common in a subject group exist dominantly in the right hemisphere, the neural substrates for efficiency exist dominantly in the left hemisphere.",
author = "Satoshi Hirose and Junichi Chikazoe and Takamitsu Watanabe and Koji Jimura and Akira Kunimatsu and Osamu Abe and Kuni Ohtomo and Yasushi Miyashita and Seiki Konishi",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0540-12.2012",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "9059--9065",
journal = "Journal of Neuroscience",
issn = "0270-6474",
publisher = "Society for Neuroscience",
number = "26",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Efficiency of Go/No-Go task performance implemented in the left Hemisphere

AU - Hirose, Satoshi

AU - Chikazoe, Junichi

AU - Watanabe, Takamitsu

AU - Jimura, Koji

AU - Kunimatsu, Akira

AU - Abe, Osamu

AU - Ohtomo, Kuni

AU - Miyashita, Yasushi

AU - Konishi, Seiki

PY - 2012/6/27

Y1 - 2012/6/27

N2 - It is well known that the efficiency of response inhibition differs from person to person, but the neural mechanism that implements the efficiency is less understood. In the present fMRI study, we devised an index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition in the go/ no-go task, and investigated the neural correlates of the efficiency of response inhibition. The human subjects who perform the go/no-go task with a shorter reaction time in go trials (Go-RT) and with a higher percentage of correct no-go trials (Nogo-PC) are thought to have the ability to conduct response inhibition more efficiently. To quantify the efficiency, we defined an efficiency index as the difference in the Nogo-PC between each subject and an ordinarily efficient subject, under the same Go-RT. An across-subject correlation analysis revealed that the brain activity in multiple regions in the left frontal and parietal cortex positively correlated with the efficiency index. Moreover, a test of hemispheric asymmetry with regard to the across-subject correlation revealed left-hemispheric dominance. The significant correlation in the left frontal and parietal regions complements the results of previous studies that used the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT), a well known index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition used in the stop-signal task. Our results also indicate that, although it is well known that the neural substrates for response inhibition common in a subject group exist dominantly in the right hemisphere, the neural substrates for efficiency exist dominantly in the left hemisphere.

AB - It is well known that the efficiency of response inhibition differs from person to person, but the neural mechanism that implements the efficiency is less understood. In the present fMRI study, we devised an index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition in the go/ no-go task, and investigated the neural correlates of the efficiency of response inhibition. The human subjects who perform the go/no-go task with a shorter reaction time in go trials (Go-RT) and with a higher percentage of correct no-go trials (Nogo-PC) are thought to have the ability to conduct response inhibition more efficiently. To quantify the efficiency, we defined an efficiency index as the difference in the Nogo-PC between each subject and an ordinarily efficient subject, under the same Go-RT. An across-subject correlation analysis revealed that the brain activity in multiple regions in the left frontal and parietal cortex positively correlated with the efficiency index. Moreover, a test of hemispheric asymmetry with regard to the across-subject correlation revealed left-hemispheric dominance. The significant correlation in the left frontal and parietal regions complements the results of previous studies that used the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT), a well known index to evaluate the efficiency of response inhibition used in the stop-signal task. Our results also indicate that, although it is well known that the neural substrates for response inhibition common in a subject group exist dominantly in the right hemisphere, the neural substrates for efficiency exist dominantly in the left hemisphere.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862884569&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862884569&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0540-12.2012

DO - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0540-12.2012

M3 - Article

C2 - 22745505

AN - SCOPUS:84862884569

VL - 32

SP - 9059

EP - 9065

JO - Journal of Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Neuroscience

SN - 0270-6474

IS - 26

ER -