Elevated B-type natriuretic peptide level as a marker of subsequent thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation

Tsuneaki Sadanaga, Shun Kosaka, Hideo Mitamura, Satoshi Ogawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to assess whether elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, as an objective marker of heart failure, is a predictor of subsequent thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) during oral anticoagulant therapy. This was a post hoc analysis of a single-center, prospective, observational study. Consecutive patients with AF (261 patients, 74 ± 9 years old, 153 paroxysmal AF) treated with warfarin were included for the analysis. BNP level at baseline examination was measured to assess the relationship of this parameter with subsequent thromboembolic events. BNP levels at the time of entry were 161 ± 188 (5-1,500, median 105) pg/ml. During an average follow-up time of 762 ± 220 (median 742) days, nine (1.8%/year) thromboembolic events occurred. Receiver operating characteristic curve showed that an optimal cut-off value for BNP to predict thromboembolic events was 218 pg/ml. There were six thromboembolic events observed among patients with a baseline BNP levels ≥200 pg/ml (n = 73) as compared to three such events in those with baseline BNP levels <200 pg/ml (n = 188). Kaplan-Meier curves for BNP level showed that elevated BNP level (≥200 pg/ml) was significantly associated with thromboembolic events (p < 0.01). Cox-proportional hazard analysis also revealed that a high BNP level (≥200 pg/ml) was a significant predictor of subsequent thromboembolic events (hazard ratio 5.32, p = 0.018). Elevated BNP levels (≥200 pg/ml) could be a useful marker of subsequent thromboembolic events in patients with AF during oral anticoagulant therapy. However, the number of patients and events in this study was small and drawing a definite conclusion was not possible with this small sample size. Therefore, further larger-scale, multicenter studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)530-535
Number of pages6
JournalHeart and Vessels
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Brain Natriuretic Peptide
Atrial Fibrillation
Anticoagulants
Warfarin
ROC Curve
Sample Size
Multicenter Studies
Observational Studies
Heart Failure
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • B-type natriuretic peptide
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Thromboembolic events

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Elevated B-type natriuretic peptide level as a marker of subsequent thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation. / Sadanaga, Tsuneaki; Kosaka, Shun; Mitamura, Hideo; Ogawa, Satoshi.

In: Heart and Vessels, Vol. 26, No. 5, 2011, p. 530-535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The aim of the present study was to assess whether elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, as an objective marker of heart failure, is a predictor of subsequent thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) during oral anticoagulant therapy. This was a post hoc analysis of a single-center, prospective, observational study. Consecutive patients with AF (261 patients, 74 ± 9 years old, 153 paroxysmal AF) treated with warfarin were included for the analysis. BNP level at baseline examination was measured to assess the relationship of this parameter with subsequent thromboembolic events. BNP levels at the time of entry were 161 ± 188 (5-1,500, median 105) pg/ml. During an average follow-up time of 762 ± 220 (median 742) days, nine (1.8{\%}/year) thromboembolic events occurred. Receiver operating characteristic curve showed that an optimal cut-off value for BNP to predict thromboembolic events was 218 pg/ml. There were six thromboembolic events observed among patients with a baseline BNP levels ≥200 pg/ml (n = 73) as compared to three such events in those with baseline BNP levels <200 pg/ml (n = 188). Kaplan-Meier curves for BNP level showed that elevated BNP level (≥200 pg/ml) was significantly associated with thromboembolic events (p < 0.01). Cox-proportional hazard analysis also revealed that a high BNP level (≥200 pg/ml) was a significant predictor of subsequent thromboembolic events (hazard ratio 5.32, p = 0.018). Elevated BNP levels (≥200 pg/ml) could be a useful marker of subsequent thromboembolic events in patients with AF during oral anticoagulant therapy. However, the number of patients and events in this study was small and drawing a definite conclusion was not possible with this small sample size. Therefore, further larger-scale, multicenter studies are needed to confirm these findings.",
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