Emergency Medical Services in Japan: An opportunity for the rational development of pre-hospital care and research

Matthew R. Lewin, Shingo Hori, Naoki Aikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Japan is at a crossroads in the development of its Emergency Medical Services (EMS). At present, Japan has an essentially pure scoop-and-run, defibrillation system. However, there is a strong movement toward expanding the scope of paramedic practice to include more complex, Advanced Life Support (ALS) and trauma protocols to its nationally standardized pre-hospital protocols. The implications of introducing complex pre-hospital protocols guided by the use of existing scientific evidence to support such action is discussed in the context of Japan's unique opportunity to test many fundamental questions in pre-hospital medical care and the public's understanding and acceptance of these practices. Japan, a technologically advanced country that is not encumbered by entrenched "standards of care," has the opportunity to develop an efficient and rational EMS system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-241
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Feb

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Emergency Medical Services
Japan
Research
Advanced Trauma Life Support Care
Allied Health Personnel
Standard of Care

Keywords

  • EMS
  • Japan
  • Paramedic
  • Pre-hospital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Emergency Medical Services in Japan : An opportunity for the rational development of pre-hospital care and research. / Lewin, Matthew R.; Hori, Shingo; Aikawa, Naoki.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 237-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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