EMS icons

Conveying information by analogy to enhance communication through electrical muscle stimulation

Tilman Dingler, Takashi Goto, Benjamin Tag, Kai Steven Kunze

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) has recently received an increased amount of attention from the HCI community. It has been used to remote control users for navigation and instrument playing, but also as a method to convey haptic feedback in VR, for example. As EMS devices become commercially available and application research continues, we explore EMS as a modality to convey information through actuation and as a means to induce and communicate emotions and moods. In this position paper, we present the results from two focus groups on using EMS for interpersonal communication as a way to send and receive emoticons through electrical stimulation. We argue that so-called "EMS Icons" have the potential to become part of multimedia experiences and more broadly of User Interfaces as a haptic variant in analogy to visual and auditory icons.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUbiComp/ISWC 2017 - Adjunct Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages732-739
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781450351904
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 11
Event2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, UbiComp/ISWC 2017 - Maui, United States
Duration: 2017 Sep 112017 Sep 15

Other

Other2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, UbiComp/ISWC 2017
CountryUnited States
CityMaui
Period17/9/1117/9/15

Fingerprint

Conveying
Muscle
Communication
Human computer interaction
Remote control
User interfaces
Navigation
Feedback

Keywords

  • Emoji
  • Emoticon
  • EMS
  • EMS Icon
  • Immersion
  • Remote communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Dingler, T., Goto, T., Tag, B., & Kunze, K. S. (2017). EMS icons: Conveying information by analogy to enhance communication through electrical muscle stimulation. In UbiComp/ISWC 2017 - Adjunct Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers (pp. 732-739). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/3123024.3129275

EMS icons : Conveying information by analogy to enhance communication through electrical muscle stimulation. / Dingler, Tilman; Goto, Takashi; Tag, Benjamin; Kunze, Kai Steven.

UbiComp/ISWC 2017 - Adjunct Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2017. p. 732-739.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dingler, T, Goto, T, Tag, B & Kunze, KS 2017, EMS icons: Conveying information by analogy to enhance communication through electrical muscle stimulation. in UbiComp/ISWC 2017 - Adjunct Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 732-739, 2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, UbiComp/ISWC 2017, Maui, United States, 17/9/11. https://doi.org/10.1145/3123024.3129275
Dingler T, Goto T, Tag B, Kunze KS. EMS icons: Conveying information by analogy to enhance communication through electrical muscle stimulation. In UbiComp/ISWC 2017 - Adjunct Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2017. p. 732-739 https://doi.org/10.1145/3123024.3129275
Dingler, Tilman ; Goto, Takashi ; Tag, Benjamin ; Kunze, Kai Steven. / EMS icons : Conveying information by analogy to enhance communication through electrical muscle stimulation. UbiComp/ISWC 2017 - Adjunct Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2017. pp. 732-739
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