Evaluation of Brillouin frequency shift and its temperature dependence in poly(pentafluorostyrene)-based polymer optical fibers by ultrasonic pulse-echo technique

Kazunari Minakawa, Kotaro Koike, Neisei Hayashi, Yasuhiro Koike, Yosuke Mizuno, Kentaro Nakamura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Poly(pentafluorostyrene) (PPFS), which can be easily synthesized and has a low optical loss window at 850 nm, is a promising alternative for a costly perfluorinated polymer as a base material of polymer optical fibers (POFs). To investigate the potential of a PPFS-POF as a Brillouin-based temperature sensing fiber, the Brillouin frequency shift and its temperature dependence of PPFS were estimated using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The temperature coefficient, which determines the sensitivity of the temperature sensing, was approximately -7.1 MHz/K independently of the molecular weight and was nearly identical to that in perfluorinated POFs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication23rd International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Print)9781628411751
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1
Event23rd International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors - Santander, Spain
Duration: 2014 Jun 22014 Jun 6

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume9157
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Other

Other23rd International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors
CountrySpain
CitySantander
Period14/6/214/6/6

Keywords

  • Brillouin scattering
  • Poly(pentafluorostyrene)
  • Polymer optical fiber
  • Temperature sensor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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