Evaluation of negative fixed-charge density in tissue-engineered cartilage by quantitative MRI and relationship with biomechanical properties

Shogo Miyata, Kazuhiro Homma, Tomokazu Numano, Tetsuya Tateishi, Takashi Ushida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Applying tissue-engineered cartilage in a clinical setting requires noninvasive evaluation to detect the maturity of the cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of articular cartilage has been widely accepted and applied clinically in recent years. In this study, we evaluated the negative fixed-charge density (nFCD) of tissue-engineered cartilage using gadolinium-enhanced MRI and determined the relationship between nFCD and biomechanical properties. To reconstruct cartilage tissue, articular chondrocytes from bovine humeral heads were embedded in agarose gel and cultured in vitro for up to 4 weeks. The nFCD of the cartilage was determined using the MRI gadolinium exclusion method. The equilibrium modulus was determined using a compressive stress relaxation test, and the dynamic modulus was determined by a dynamic compression test. The equilibrium compressive modulus and dynamic modulus of the tissue-engineered cartilage increased with an increase in culture time. The nFCD value - as determined with the [Gd-DTPA2-]measurement using the MRI technique - increased with culture time. In the regression analysis, nFCD showed significant correlations with equilibrium compressive modulus and dynamic modulus. From these results, gadolinium-enhanced MRI measurements can serve as a useful predictor of the biomechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume132
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jul

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Charge density
Magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Tissue
Gadolinium
Articular Cartilage
Humeral Head
Chondrocytes
Exercise Test
Sepharose
Stress relaxation
Gels
Compressive stress
Regression Analysis
Regression analysis

Keywords

  • Dynamic compressive modulus
  • Equilibrium compressive modulus
  • Fixed-charge density
  • Gd-DTPA
  • MRI
  • Tissue-engineered cartilage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Evaluation of negative fixed-charge density in tissue-engineered cartilage by quantitative MRI and relationship with biomechanical properties. / Miyata, Shogo; Homma, Kazuhiro; Numano, Tomokazu; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Ushida, Takashi.

In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 132, No. 7, 07.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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