Evaluation of randomized controlled trials of foods with functional claims request: The learning outcomes from studies in Japan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new system for foods with functional claims (FFC) was implemented in April 2015. The efficacy of FFC must now be proven by systematic review or randomized clinical trials (RCTs). The aim of this study was to establish the scientific reporting quality of RCTs on the efficacy of FFC and to identify areas that require improvement. The reporting quality of 33 RCT papers on 31 FFC that were received between April 1, 2015 and December 31, 2016 were analyzed by two experts with regard to consistency with the 29 Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) items. RCTs on FFC reported 13.8 (47.6%) of the CONSORT items, which is similar to those on FOSHU. There were 7 least reported items, including study design. Determining the reporting quality of FFC studies is an important way of identifying items that require improvement in future papers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-253
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Functional Foods
Volume42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Functional Food
randomized clinical trials
Japan
learning
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Learning
systematic review
food quality
Food Quality
experimental design

Keywords

  • CONSORT statement
  • Efficacy
  • Foods with functional claims
  • Japan
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Reporting quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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abstract = "A new system for foods with functional claims (FFC) was implemented in April 2015. The efficacy of FFC must now be proven by systematic review or randomized clinical trials (RCTs). The aim of this study was to establish the scientific reporting quality of RCTs on the efficacy of FFC and to identify areas that require improvement. The reporting quality of 33 RCT papers on 31 FFC that were received between April 1, 2015 and December 31, 2016 were analyzed by two experts with regard to consistency with the 29 Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) items. RCTs on FFC reported 13.8 (47.6{\%}) of the CONSORT items, which is similar to those on FOSHU. There were 7 least reported items, including study design. Determining the reporting quality of FFC studies is an important way of identifying items that require improvement in future papers.",
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