Exceptional Evolutionary Divergence of Human Muscle and Brain Metabolomes Parallels Human Cognitive and Physical Uniqueness

Katarzyna Bozek, Yuning Wei, Zheng Yan, Xiling Liu, Jieyi Xiong, Masahiro Sugimoto, Masaru Tomita, Svante Pääbo, Raik Pieszek, Chet C. Sherwood, Patrick R. Hof, John J. Ely, Dirk Steinhauser, Lothar Willmitzer, Jens Bangsbo, Ola Hansson, Josep Call, Patrick Giavalisco, Philipp Khaitovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolite concentrations reflect the physiological states of tissues and cells. However, the role of metabolic changes in species evolution is currently unknown. Here, we present a study of metabolome evolution conducted in three brain regions and two non-neural tissues from humans, chimpanzees, macaque monkeys, and mice based on over 10,000 hydrophilic compounds. While chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse metabolomes diverge following the genetic distances among species, we detect remarkable acceleration of metabolome evolution in human prefrontal cortex and skeletal muscle affecting neural and energy metabolism pathways. These metabolic changes could not be attributed to environmental conditions and were confirmed against the expression of their corresponding enzymes. We further conducted muscle strength tests in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The results suggest that, while humans are characterized by superior cognition, their muscular performance might be markedly inferior to that of chimpanzees and macaque monkeys.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1001871
JournalPLoS Biology
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

metabolome
divergent evolution
Pan troglodytes
Metabolome
Macaca
Muscle
Brain
Tissue
brain
Muscles
muscles
Metabolites
Haplorhini
monkeys
muscle strength
mice
Muscle Strength
Enzymes
physiological state
Prefrontal Cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Exceptional Evolutionary Divergence of Human Muscle and Brain Metabolomes Parallels Human Cognitive and Physical Uniqueness. / Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Xiling; Xiong, Jieyi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Pääbo, Svante; Pieszek, Raik; Sherwood, Chet C.; Hof, Patrick R.; Ely, John J.; Steinhauser, Dirk; Willmitzer, Lothar; Bangsbo, Jens; Hansson, Ola; Call, Josep; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp.

In: PLoS Biology, Vol. 12, No. 5, e1001871, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bozek, K, Wei, Y, Yan, Z, Liu, X, Xiong, J, Sugimoto, M, Tomita, M, Pääbo, S, Pieszek, R, Sherwood, CC, Hof, PR, Ely, JJ, Steinhauser, D, Willmitzer, L, Bangsbo, J, Hansson, O, Call, J, Giavalisco, P & Khaitovich, P 2014, 'Exceptional Evolutionary Divergence of Human Muscle and Brain Metabolomes Parallels Human Cognitive and Physical Uniqueness', PLoS Biology, vol. 12, no. 5, e1001871. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001871
Bozek, Katarzyna ; Wei, Yuning ; Yan, Zheng ; Liu, Xiling ; Xiong, Jieyi ; Sugimoto, Masahiro ; Tomita, Masaru ; Pääbo, Svante ; Pieszek, Raik ; Sherwood, Chet C. ; Hof, Patrick R. ; Ely, John J. ; Steinhauser, Dirk ; Willmitzer, Lothar ; Bangsbo, Jens ; Hansson, Ola ; Call, Josep ; Giavalisco, Patrick ; Khaitovich, Philipp. / Exceptional Evolutionary Divergence of Human Muscle and Brain Metabolomes Parallels Human Cognitive and Physical Uniqueness. In: PLoS Biology. 2014 ; Vol. 12, No. 5.
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